coronavirus
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

coronavirus

The coal-fired Huaneng Power Plant in Huai 'an City, Jiangsu Province, China on Sept. 13, 2020. Costfoto / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

One of the silver linings of the coronavirus pandemic was the record drop in greenhouse gas emissions following national lockdowns. But that drop is set to all but reverse as economies begin to recover, the International Energy Agency (IEA) warned Tuesday.

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David Attenborough narrates "The Year Earth Changed," premiering globally April 16 on Apple TV+. Apple

Next week marks the second Earth Day of the coronavirus pandemic. While a year of lockdowns and travel restrictions has limited our ability to explore the natural world and gather with others for its defense, it is still possible to experience the wonder and inspiration from the safety of your home.

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waterlust.com / @tulasendlesssummer_sierra .

Each product featured here has been independently selected by the writer. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

The bright patterns and recognizable designs of Waterlust's activewear aren't just for show. In fact, they're meant to promote the conversation around sustainability and give back to the ocean science and conservation community.

Each design is paired with a research lab, nonprofit, or education organization that has high intellectual merit and the potential to move the needle in its respective field. For each product sold, Waterlust donates 10% of profits to these conservation partners.

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A surgical mask floats in the ocean. Eloi_Omella / Getty Images

By David Shiffman

As we enter what's hopefully the home stretch of the COVID-19 pandemic, it's time to take stock of how it affected every aspect of our world, to consider what happened, what could be done different to avoid those problems in the future, and what's next.

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A Honduran couple are forced to leave their flooded home near San Pedro Sula in Honduras on November 20, 2020 in the aftermath of Hurricane Iota. Orlando Sierra / AFP / Getty Images

Climate change, the coronavirus pandemic, and growing inequality will exacerbate global volatility over the coming decades, a report by top U.S. intelligence officials released Thursday warns.

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Amazon and other tech employees hold a walkout past the Amazon Spheres during the Global Climate Strike on Sept. 20, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. Karen Ducey / Getty Images

Amazon illegally fired two employees after they publicly criticized the company for its lack of action on climate change and its failure to protect warehouse workers from the novel coronavirus, the National Labor Relations Board determined.

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An aerial picture shows a deforested area close to Sinop, Mato Grosso State, Brazil, taken on August 7, 2020. Florian Plaucheur / AFP / Getty Images

A new study published Wednesday found that the destruction of primary forest increased by 12% in 2020, impacting ecosystems that store vast amounts of carbon and shelter abundant biodiversity.

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Independent pharmacy and lab Valisure has found high concentrations of benzene in 22 hand sanitizers. Morsa Images / Getty Images

As people rushed to buy hand sanitizer during the first months of the pandemic, new brands emerged to fill the gap left by more well-known labels. But in the frenzy, some manufacturers appear to have cut corners.

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WWF activists light candles for Earth Hour in front of a darkened St. Basil's Cathedral on March, 27,2021, in Moscow, Russia. Mikhail Svetlov / Getty Images

Cities around the globe dimmed their lights for an hour on Saturday, to mark Earth Hour. The annual event organized by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) encourages countries to dim their lights for an hour starting at 8:30 p.m. local time.

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Hawaiian food rescue group Aloha Harvest has helped to prevent food waste during the ongoing pandemic.

Last year, COVID-19 lockdowns forced many restaurants to close and events to be canceled at the last minute, so a lot of food that was already purchased stood to be wasted.

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A small group of masked Fridays For Future participants protest in Rome, Italy, on Feb. 19, 2021. Matteo Nardone / Pacific Press / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Martin Kuebler

When Fridays for Future (FFF) takes to the streets on March 19, activists around the world are going to be doing everything they can to make sure the climate crisis stays in the news.

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Pollen can suppress how the body's immune system responds to viruses. Callista Images / Getty Images

By Lewis Ziska

Exposure to pollen can make you more susceptible to COVID-19, and it isn't just a problem for people with allergies, new research released March 9 shows. Plant physiologist Lewis Ziska, a co-author of the new peer-reviewed study and other recent research on pollen and climate change, explains the findings and why pollen seasons are getting longer and more intense.

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On Thursday religious groups and leaders across the globe planned more than 400 events in over 40 countries for what organizers are calling the largest-ever faith-based day of action for climate justice. Smileus / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

"We envision a world transformed, in which humanity in all its diversity has developed a shared reverence for life on Earth."

So declares a new joint statement—entitled "Sacred People, Sacred Earth"—supported by religious groups and leaders across the globe who planned more than 400 events in over 40 countries for Thursday in what organizers are calling the largest-ever faith-based day of action for climate justice.

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