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Steve Carrara, head custodian for Dr. Philip O. Coakley Middle School in Norwood, cleans school buses with disinfectant as a precaution against the coronavirus on March 8, 2020 in Norwood, MA. Jessica Rinaldi / The Boston Globe / Getty Images

By Casey Crownhart

Disinfectant use has exploded during the coronavirus pandemic as people try to keep their hands and surfaces clean. But one family of cleaning chemicals is receiving scrutiny for potential health concerns.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Shelter-in-place orders in the San Francisco Bay area in March 2020 effectively simulated a future with fewer gas-powered cars. Josh Edelson / AFP / Getty Images

Many people expect the future of transportation to be electric, and that drivers will charge their cars with solar and wind power. Recently, scientists got a window into that future and saw what it could mean for the climate and people's health.

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stocknroll / Getty Images

More and more Americans are retrofitting their bathrooms with high-end bidets, allowing them to enjoy cleanliness and hygiene without creating as much paper waste. Not all bidets are created equal, however, and before deciding on a particular brand, it's important to do your homework. Take a look at our comprehensive Toto bidet review, and our reviews of Tushy and Omigo, to learn more about all of their options.

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A food vendor wears a face mask inside a food truck on December 31, 2020 in New York City. Noam Galai / Getty Images

The COVID-19 pandemic is changing the way we eat.

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Trump signs House Joint Resolution 41, removing some Dodd-Frank regulations on oil and gas companies, on Feb. 14, 2017. SAUL LOEB / AFP via Getty Images

A new report by a commission of health experts found 22,000 deaths in 2019 were caused by Trump's failed environmental policies alone.

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The most effective COVID prevention strategies – ventilation, physical distancing and wearing masks – are challenging in an indoor dining setting. Mikhail Spaskov / Getty Images

By Ryan Malosh

Editor's Note: With another holiday approaching, it's tempting to want a taste of freedom from COVID-19 social distancing. Who doesn't want sweet nothings over a glass of Champagne and some chocolate cake? But it's also important to remember that daily case numbers are still higher now than they were throughout most of 2020. The risk of catching COVID-19 is still extremely high in most parts of the country. Epidemiologist Ryan Malosh answers some questions about eating out and socializing.

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A tourist photographs emperor penguins in Antarctica. Raimund Linke / Getty Images

By Michelle Power and Meagan Dewar

In December, Antarctica lost its status as the last continent free of COVID-19 when 36 people at the Chilean Bernardo O'Higgins research station tested positive. The station's isolation from other bases and fewer researchers in the continent means the outbreak is now likely contained.

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The headquarters of the United States Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, DC on July 17, 2013. Matt McClain / The Washington Post via Getty Images

For the third time in three years, the U.S. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has ordered Amazon to stop selling illegal pesticides.

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The vast majority of bats are harmless to humans. However, climate change has increased bat biodiversity in the region where scientists think the virus behind COVID-19 may have originated. BirdHunter591 / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Experts have described the coronavirus pandemic as the kind of crisis that will become even more likely as the planet warms. But now, researchers think that climate change may have actually played a role in the emergence of the viruses that caused both SARS and COVID-19.

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Nepal's COVID-19 lockdown decreased air pollution levels in the Kathmandu Valley, seen here on March 29, 2020, and known as one of the world's most polluted cities. Narayan Maharjan / NurPhoto / Getty Images

When countries began going into lockdown last winter and spring, clearer skies from reduced traffic and industry were hailed as a rare bright spot during a difficult time.

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Demonstrators in a car caravan gather across from the shuttered Crawford Power Generating Station in the Little Village neighborhood of Chicago as part of an Earth Day to May Day action on April 22, 2020, after the demolition of a smoke stack blanketed the surrounding neighborhood in dust during the COVID-19 pandemic. Max Herman / NurPhoto via Getty Images

Southwest Chicago's Little Village neighborhood is one of the city's most polluted neighborhoods and has also been ravaged by the novel coronavirus, Grist reports, yet another stark instance in which the pandemic has illuminated and exacerbated existing environmental injustices.

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It's important to monitor viruses for new mutations that could make them more deadly, more transmissible or both. Douglas Magno /AFP / Getty Images

By Richard Kuhn

The SARS-CoV-2 virus mutates fast. That's a concern because these more transmissible variants of SARS-CoV-2 are now present in the U.S., U.K. and South Africa and other countries, and many people are wondering whether the current vaccines will protect the recipients from the virus. Furthermore, many question whether we will we be able to keep ahead of future variants of SARS-CoV-2, which will certainly arise.

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Families worried about possible long-term effects of pandemic-related disruption can learn from these proven strategies. SDI Productions / Getty Images

By Amanda Sheffield Morris and Jennifer Hays-Grudo

Parents are dealing with huge demands on their time and energy. Children may not be attending school or involved in regular activities. As the pandemic continues to wreak havoc on families, routines have collapsed, patience is wearing thin and self-care is a distant memory.

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