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Privacy Policy

EcoWatch will never, under any circumstances, sell, trade or make public your personal information, unless you designate otherwise. All personal information you provide will remain confidential. You will always have the option to edit the information provided to us or to have your personal information removed from our records.

Email Newsletters

After subscribing to EcoWatch's email list, users will receive email newsletters and other occasional announcements from EcoWatch and our partners. Users can unsubscribe from email newsletters at any time.

Traffic Data

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Advertising

We use third-party advertising companies to serve ads when you visit our website. These companies may use aggregated information (not including your name, address, email address or telephone number) about your visits to this and other Websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. If you would like more information about this practice and to know your choices about not having this information used by these companies, click here.

Use of Cookies

EcoWatch employs cookies, which are small text files placed on your computer’s hard drive. We use cookies to count the number of visitors to our website; the cookie enables us to distinguish repeat visitors from new visitors. Persistent cookies can be removed by following your browser help file directions. If visitors decline cookies, some portions of our site that depend on cookies may be inaccessible or slower to access. Cookies also help us diagnose problems with our server.

Discussion Forum

EcoWatch uses the comment platform Disqus. Any information disclosed in these areas becomes publicly available, and therefore you should exercise caution when disclosing personal information.

Survey

EcoWatch will conduct voluntary surveys of site visitors to obtain demographic information about its readers. This information may be compiled and shared with third parties, but no personal details will be traceable or associated with specific readers.

Petitions

EcoWatch hosts two kinds of petitions: petitions run by EcoWatch lobbying government organizations and/or corporations to improve environmental standards and paid petitions sponsored by third parties, typically nonprofits.

For EcoWatch sponsored and 3rd party petitions, the target of the petition and EcoWatch will receive the information provided by the signer.

On petitions that run on EcoWatch, there is a checkbox below the personal information to opt into various newsletters and memberships including from our sponsors. Sponsors will only receive personal information provided if the user leaves the box opted-in. EcoWatch reserves the right to subscribe all signers who opt in to any offer on a petition to its daily newsletter. If a user does not wish to receive such communications and offers, they can uncheck the box on the petition, or unsubscribe from any newsletter or membership at anytime.

Links to Other Sites

EcoWatch contains links to other sites. We are not responsible for the privacy practices or the content of such websites.

Children’s Guidelines

Protecting the rights of children is important to us. As a result, we do not collect or maintain any information from individuals we know to be under 13 years old, and no part of EcoWatch is intended to attract anyone under 13.

Other Disclosure of Personal Information

EcoWatch will not use or disclose your personal information without your consent, except (i) as described in this privacy policy or (ii) as required by law, court order or as requested by other government or law enforcement authority. This policy does not protect information you post in comments or other public forum within our website.

Contacting EcoWatch

If you have any questions or concerns regarding these policies, you may send an email to EcoWatch via this online form.  All requests will be formally reviewed by our staff and will be answered within 48 hours.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A dead sea lion on the beach at Border Field State Park, near the international border wall between San Diego, California and Tijuana, Mexico. Sherry Smith / iStock / Getty Images

While Trump's border wall has yet to be completed, the threat it poses to pollinators is already felt, according to the National Butterfly Center in Mission, Texas, as reported by Transmission & Distribution World.

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By Alisa Opar

For Chinook salmon, the urge to return home and spawn isn't just strong — it's imperative. And for the first time in more than 65 years, at least 23 fish that migrated as juveniles from California's San Joaquin River and into the Pacific Ocean have heeded that call and returned as adults during the annual spring run.

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AnnaPustynnikova / iStock / Getty Images

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Jose A. Bernat Bacete / Moment / Getty Images

By Bridget Shirvell

On a farm in upstate New York, a cheese brand is turning millions of pounds of food scraps into electricity needed to power its on-site businesses. Founded by eight families, each with their own dairy farms, Craigs Creamery doesn't just produce various types of cheddar, mozzarella, Swiss and Muenster cheeses, sold in chunks, slices, shreds and snack bars; they're also committed to becoming a zero-waste operation.

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Coal ash has contaminated the Vermilion River in Illinois. Eco-Justice Collaborative / CC BY-SA 2.0

By Jessica A. Knoblauch

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picture-alliance / AP Photo / NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center

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