Quantcast

7-Eleven to Power 425 Texas Stores With Wind Energy

Popular

7-Eleven, Inc. will energize 425 stories in Texas with wind energy it will buy from TXU Energy. This initiative is expected to reduce 7-Eleven's carbon footprint by 6.7 percent and reduce operating costs.


The energy will come exclusively from wind farms in Texas, which is a state with more than 10,000 turbines. The agreement is 96 months and begins June 1, 2018.

"This agreement is beneficial for 7-Eleven on several fronts," Ben Tison, 7-Eleven senior vice president of development, said in a press release. "Wind energy is a renewable, more cost-effective resource that will lower the carbon footprint of these stores as well as operating costs. Our customers, particularly Millennials and the younger Generation Z, care about sustainability and reducing environmental impacts, and they're paying attention to what companies are doing."

Last year, 7-Eleven outlined three steps to reduce its environmental footprint, touching on people, planet and products. The planet pillar, for example, means reducing its energy footprint in stores by 20 percent by 2025. The retail chain has already taken steps to reach their goal by installing LED lighting, energy management systems, and high-efficiency heating and air conditioning units.

"Our goal was to make sure that we were helping 7-Eleven reach its sustainability goals," Gabe Castro, vice president of business for TXU Energy, said. "We were able to do that by helping them through the process to evaluate all of the options available, and then customizing a complete solution to help them reach those goals. We are proud to collaborate with 7-Eleven."

Texas is a perfect state for 7-Eleven to be making these lofty wind power goals. It is, in fact, the leading state when it comes to wind capacity, both installed and under construction. Texas is also home to six of the top 10 largest wind farms in the nation, according to the U.S. Energy Information Association. The 781.5 megawatt Roscoe Wind Farm, 220 miles west of Dallas, is the largest in the world with 627 turbines across 100,000 acres.

Wind power in Texas hasn't only provided a source of clean energy, it's also a big economic driver, creating more than 22,000 jobs in operations and maintenance, construction, manufacturing and many support sectors, according American Wind Energy Association.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Protests led by Native Hawaiians have blocked the construction of a telescope at the summit of Mauna Kea on Big Island. Actions for Mauna Kea / Facebook

By Jessica Corbett

A week after construction was scheduled to resume on a long-delayed $1.4 billion telescope at the summit of Mauna Kea — a dormant volcano on Hawaii's Big Island — thousands of Native Hawaiians who consider the mountain sacred continued to protest the planned observatory.

Read More Show Less
California Condor at soaring at the Grand Canyon. Pavliha / iStock / Getty Images

North America's largest bird passed an important milestone this spring when the 1,000th California condor chick hatched since recovery efforts began, NPR reported Sunday.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
The Roloway monkey has been pushed closer to extinction. Sonja Wolters / WAPCA / IUCN

The statistics around threatened species are looking grim. A new report by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has added more than 9,000 new additions to its Red List of threatened species, pushing the total number of species on the list to more than 105,000 for the first time, according to the Guardian.

Read More Show Less
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / AFP / Getty Images

The campaign to re-elect President Donald Trump has found a new way to troll liberals and sea turtles.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Night long exposure photograph of wildifires in Santa Clarita, California. FrozenShutter / E+ / Getty Images

By Kristy Dahl

Last week, UCS released Killer Heat, a report analyzing how the frequency of days with a dangerously hot heat index — the combination of temperature and humidity the National Weather Service calls the "feels like" temperature — will change in response to the global emissions choices we make in the coming decades.

Read More Show Less
A Zara store in Times Square, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong. Timahaowemi / CC BY-SA 3.0

Green is the new black at Zara.

The Spanish fast fashion behemoth has made a bold move to steer its industry to a more environmentally friendly future for textiles. Inditex, Zara's parent company, announced that all the polyester, cotton and linen it uses will be sustainably produced by 2025, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Gavin Van De Walle, MS, RD

Whether you enjoy running recreationally, competitively, or as part of your overall wellness goals, it's a great way to improve your heart health.

Read More Show Less