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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life
Costa's Hummingbirds are frequent visitors at feeders in Arizona and southern California. Julian Avery / CC BY-ND

By Julian Avery

Millions of Americans enjoy feeding and watching backyard birds. Many people make a point of putting food out in winter, when birds needs extra energy, and spring, when many species build nests and raise young.

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A new survey from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine found that nearly 40 percent of people are sleep-deprived the Monday after the Super Bowl. Anna Bizon / Getty Images
  • Last year, an estimated 14 million people were planning to take off work the day after the Super Bowl on what's become the most famous sick day of the year: #SuperSickMonday.
  • A new survey finds that 40 percent of people say they're sleep-deprived the day after the Super Bowl.
  • Even just one night of sleep deprivation can take a toll on your physical and mental health.

A new survey from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) found nearly 40 percent of people are sleep-deprived the Monday after the Super Bowl.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Kimchi, seen above, is a sour Korean dish often made from cabbage and other vegetables. Because it's a fermented food, it boasts numerous probiotics. KarpenkovDenis / iStock / Getty Images

By Cecilia Snyder, MS, RD

Historically, it hasn't always been possible to grow fresh vegetables throughout the year.

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Pakistanis carry a patient who was affected by a heatwave to take her to a hospital in Karachi, Pakistan, on June 25, 2015. Abbas Ali / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

An additional 2,100 deaths from fatal injuries may occur in the U.S. every year from a 2 C rise in temperatures, which could have grave implications for global changes associated with the climate crisis.

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During the university conference on racial reconciliation, a multi ethnic group listens as a young adult woman speaks. SDI Productions / E+ / Getty Images

By Marty Swanbrow Becker

When college students seek help for a mental health issue on campus — something they are doing more often — the place they usually go is the college counseling center.

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Suicide rates are highest for males in construction and extraction; females in arts, design, entertainment, sports and media, the CDC found. Michelllaurence / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

From 2000 to 2016, the suicide rate among American workers has increased 34 percent, up 12.9 per 100,000 working persons to 17.3, according to a worrisome new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Workers with the highest suicide rates have construction, mining and drilling jobs, the U.S. health officials reported Thursday.

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Men take a break from walking along the Brooklyn Bridge on a hot day in New York, June 29, 2018. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

As a summer of record high temperatures continues, a sobering new study suggests that more summers like this could have serious mental health consequences.

The study, published in Nature Climate Change Monday, found that, for every one degree Celsius increase in average monthly temperature, suicide rates go up by 0.7 percent in U.S. counties and 2.1 percent in Mexican municipalities, adding suicide to the list of deadly consequences of climate change.

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SoloTravelGoals / Unsplash

By Jana Richman

In a dark time, the eye begins to see.

Theodore Roethke

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David Buckel worked at the Red Hook Community Farm. Added Value / YouTube

A nationally known civil rights lawyer and environmental advocate died after setting himself on fire in Brooklyn's Prospect Park on Saturday to protest environmental destruction.

David Buckel, 60, doused himself with an accelerant before starting a fire that ultimately killed him.

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