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BBC headquarters in London. Mike Kemp / In Pictures / Getty Images

BBC Issues First Climate Change Reporting Guidelines

After a summer full of extreme weather headlines, The BBC is making a concerted effort to improve its coverage of climate change.

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Politics
NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio and London Mayor Sadiq Khan at a forum on Sept. 18, 2016. Michael Appleton / Mayoral Photography Office

London and New York Mayors Call on Other World Cities to Divest from Fossil Fuels

As regional, state, city and business leaders head to San Francisco for the Global Climate Action Summit Wednesday, New York City and London are stepping up as urban leaders on climate change.

In a joint statement published in The Guardian on Monday, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and London Mayor Sadiq Khan urged cities around the world to join them in divesting from fossil fuels.

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Climate

Interactive Map: Climate in 2050

By Dipika Kadaba

The past few summers have brought some of the hottest months on record. Unfortunately, things are only projected to get worse as climate change continues to push temperatures up around the world.

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Climate
Boston Globe / Getty Images

September Heatwave Is Closing Northeast Schools

Schools across the northeastern U.S. are cutting the school days short this week as extreme heat and a lack of air conditioning combine to make dangerous conditions inside classrooms.

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Climate
Wikimedia Commons

Strongest, Oldest Arctic Sea Ice Breaks Up for First Time on Record

The Arctic is warming at a rate twice as fast as the rest of the globe, and now the region's thickest and oldest sea ice—also known as "the last ice area"—is breaking up for the first time on record, the Guardian reported Tuesday.

The breakage has opened up waters north of Greenland that are normally frozen-solid even in the peak of summer.

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Pexels

Researchers Predict 'Anomalously Warm' 2018-2022

The summer of 2018 has been marked by record-breaking heat across the globe. But if you're already sweating now, you might want to prepare yourself for the next four years as well, according to new global forecasting research.

The study, published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, predicts that the years between 2018-2022 will likely be "anomalously warm," and reinforces long-term climate change trends.

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Climate
A woman holds an umbrella as she walks along a street in Tokyo on July 23, as Japan suffers from a heatwave. MARTIN BUREAU / AFP / Getty Images

More Than 70,000 People Hospitalized Amid Record-Breaking Heat in Japan

An ongoing heatwave has sent a record 71,266 people to hospitals across Japan between April 30 and Aug. 5 with 138 people dying from heat-related illnesses, The Japan Times reported, citing the nation's Fire and Disaster Management Agency.

The busy capital of Tokyo saw the highest number of people taken to hospitals, at 5,994. Osaka followed with 5,272. About 40 percent of the total tally consists of elderly people.

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Climate
iStock / Getty Images

Scientists Warn We May Be on Track for 'Hothouse Earth'

In two recent studies, scientists have looked into the future and into the past to see what might happen to the global climate if we fail to curb greenhouse gas emissions in time. The results are frightening.

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Climate
A firefighter uses pool water to fight the Mendocino Complex Fire, now the largest in California history. NOAH BERGER / AFP / Getty Images

Mendocino Complex Fire Now the Largest in California History

California's disastrous wildfire season has surpassed last year's historically destructive season in at least one respect.

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