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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life
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By Jeff Turrentine

From day to day, our public health infrastructure — the people and systems we've put in place to keep populations, as opposed to individuals, healthy — largely goes unnoticed. That's because when it's working well, its success takes the form of utter normalcy.

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Spring Break vs. COVID19: The Real Impact of Ignoring Social Distancing

By Eoin Higgins

A viral video showing cell phone data collected by location accuracy company X-Mode from spring break partiers potentially spreading the coronavirus around the U.S. has brought up questions of digital privacy even as it shows convincingly the importance of staying home to defeat the disease.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Scientists describe grief, hope about climate change

By Peter Sinclair

This month's original YCC "This Is Not Cool" video shows how several experienced climate scientists are handling the emotional and personal feelings that many feel in grasping the potential adverse effects of runaway climate change. In the current global context posed by the coronavirus pandemic, there are striking similarities between the COVID-19 disease and risks posed by climate change.

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A protester takes part in a demonstration for climate action in Bordeaux, France on March 14, 2020. MEHDI FEDOUACH / AFP / Getty Images

By Eric Galbraith and Ross Otto

In the past few weeks, governments around the world have enacted dramatic measures to mitigate the threat of COVID-19.

It's too soon to know whether these measures will prove too little to limit mass mortality, or so extreme that they set off economic catastrophe. But what is absolutely clear is that the pandemic response is in stark contrast to the lack of effective action on climate change, despite a number of similarities between the two threats.

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By Tamara Hew-Butler and Mariane Fahlman

So here we are, perfecting our social distancing skills while schools, sports and other forms of social engagement are on indefinite hold, by a dangerous virus named after a (regal) crown. The coronavirus is named because the center envelope is surrounded by small protein spikes called peplomers. These little protein spikes wreak havoc when they attach to lung tissue and hijack otherwise healthy tissue into building a potentially lethal coronavirus army of invaders.

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Tero Vesalainen / iStock / Getty Images

By Kristen Fischer

  • Experts say there's no clear evidence that ibuprofen makes COVID-19 worse.
  • One thing specific to COVID-19 is that some lab experiments are showing that ibuprofen may boost the amount of ACE2 receptors that the virus uses to infect cells and could make the virus spread faster.
  • But that's just theoretical.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has changed its stance on taking ibuprofen if you have COVID-19, but people are still scratching their heads over what they should take if or when they contract the virus.

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By Stephen D. Benning, Brian Labus and Kimberly A. Barchard

Public health officials consistently promote hand-washing as a way for people to protect themselves from the COVID-19 coronavirus. However, this virus can live on metal and plastic for days, so simply adjusting your eyeglasses with unwashed hands may be enough to infect yourself. Thus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization have been telling people to stop touching their faces.

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A worker disinfects around the No. 7 Hospital, once designated for only COVID-19 patients, in Wuhan in central China's Hubei province Thursday, March 19, 2020. The hospital is getting back to be a normal hospital after the last coronavirus patient was transferred away. Feature China / Barcroft Media / Getty Images

As the new coronavirus continues to spread across the globe, the country and city where it originated reported a hopeful milestone.

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By John R. Platt

With the coronavirus continuing to spread and self-isolation becoming the norm, it feels more important than ever to embrace the power and beauty of nature. Sure, we can't travel as much these days, but the modern world can still bring the natural world to us.

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A protective face mask on the ground in front of the Eiffel tower in Paris on March on 17, 2020 while a strict lockdown comes into in effect to stop the spread of the COVID-19 in France. LUDOVIC MARIN / AFP via Getty Images

Widespread containment measures are due to go into effect across much of Germany, France and Spain starting on Tuesday. Non-essential businesses and shops will be closed and residents have been urged to remain at home.

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Jahi Chikwendiu / The Washington Post / Getty Images

By Jeff Turrentine

Back in 2017, a few weeks before Donald Trump became the most powerful individual in the world, a New Yorker cartoon by Will McPhail did what the best New Yorker cartoons do: It made you laugh, and then — once you stopped laughing — it made you think. Trump had just won the presidency in part by redefining populism as the belief that experience and expertise should count for far less than ideology and intensity. Without mentioning him by name, and without even making reference to politics for that matter, McPhail managed to capture the frustration and anxiety that millions were feeling.

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