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People of all ages are spending more of their day looking at their phones, computers and television screens, but parents now have another reason for limiting how much screen time their children get — it could lead to behavioral problems.

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Scientists have some bad news for those who catch a case of hay fever each spring: allergy season is beginning earlier and becoming more intense due to climate change.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Physical activity may be one of the best defenses against the onset of disability in old age, according to a new study.

Researchers at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine found that being moderately active for just one hour per week helped to prevent mobility-limiting disabilities in older adults with lower extremity joint pain and stiffness.

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Los Alamos County, New Mexico ranks second in the U.S. News & World Report's latest list of "healthiest communities." Daniel Schwen / CC BY-SA 4.0

Colorado's Douglas County, in the Denver metropolitan area, is the United States' healthiest community in 2019, according to the U.S. News & World Report's latest rankings.

This year, Douglas County unseated the Washington, DC suburb of Falls Church, Virginia for the top spot in U.S. News' second annual America's Healthiest Communities rankings. Falls Church dropped down to the third spot this year, while Los Alamos County, New Mexico ranked second.

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Links between excess sugar in your diet and disease have been well-documented, but new research by Harvard's School of Public Health might make you even more wary of that next soda: it could increase your risk of an early death.

The study, published this week in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation, found that drinking one or two sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) each day — like sodas or sports drinks — increases risk of an early death by 14 percent.

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The SOAR Charter school in Denver, Colorado has been serving vegetarian meals for years. Helen H. Richardson / The Denver Post / Getty Images

For students in the United States' largest school district, "Meatloaf Monday" in the cafeteria will soon be a thing of the past.

Instead, New York City public schools will be adopting "Meatless Mondays" for the 2019-2020 school year in an effort to improve public health and reduce the city's environmental footprint, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced this week.

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Millions of children across the U.S. have been exposed to high concentrations of lead through their school drinking water due to inconsistent testing standards, a recent study found.

Researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health reviewed 25 state programs for testing for lead in schools' drinking water supply and found that there is no uniformity in states' approaches to develop initiatives to test for lead in school drinking water, action levels or maintaining water quality data — public schools in some states are not even required to perform testing on all drinking water taps.

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Having access to green spaces such as parks and forests as a child may be beneficial to your mental health later in life, new research out of Aarhus University in Denmark suggests.

According to a study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in the United States of America, Danish children who grew up with less greenery nearby from birth to age 10 were as much as 55 percent more at risk of developing a mental disorder later in life. Moreover, the researchers found that the risks actually decreased the longer children spent living close to nature — regardless of whether they lived in urban or rural areas.

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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in April 2018 proposed relaxing standards related to how it assesses the effects of exposure to low levels of toxic chemicals on public health.

Now, correspondence obtained by the LA Times revealed just how deeply involved industry lobbyists and a controversial, industry-funded toxicologist were in drafting the federal agency's proposal to scrap its current, protective approach to regulating toxin exposure.

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