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Welcome to EcoWatch

Insights + Opinion

Welcome to the EcoWatch website in partnership with Waterkeeper Alliance. After one year of planning, it feels great to finally go live and expand our coverage nationwide. This website works to unite the voice of the grassroots environmental movement and mobilize millions of Americans to engage in democracy to protect human health and the environment.

For the last six years, EcoWatch has been promoting the work of Ohio’s sustainability community through its bi-monthly newspaper EcoWatch Journal. We're excited to take this successful model nationwide and promote the work of the grassroots environmental movement in the U.S. through our news service website ecowatch.com.

This website is the first media source to focus exclusively on news from more than 700 environmental organizations across the country. In addition, the site showcases original content in its Insights column from leading national voices in the environmental movement, including EcoWatch’s advisory board members—Wendy Abrams, Ed Begley, Jr., Lester Brown, Laurie David, Paul Hawken, Randy Hayes, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Phil Radford and Harvey Wasserman.

“The current assault on America’s environmental laws, like the Clean Water Act, creates a pressing need to educate and engage people to protect our infrastructure, the air we breathe, the water we drink, to provide our children with the same opportunities for dignity and enrichment as our parents gave us,” said Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. founder and president of Waterkeeper Alliance. “This website encourages people to be part of the solution and engage in democracy.”

EcoWatch’s partnership with Waterkeeper Alliance is a great example of how organizations can combine efforts to help realize each group’s mission.

“Waterkeeper Alliance is excited to work with EcoWatch to help strengthen environmental policy, motivate people to take action in protecting our natural resources, and make the world’s waterways swimmable, drinkable and fishable,” said Marc Yaggi, executive director of Waterkeeper Alliance.

This website is a dedicated and neutral platform for grassroots environmental organizations that will help transform the ability of individuals to learn about environmental issues and take action. The news service will provide timely access to relevant information that will motivate individuals to become engaged in their community, adopt sustainable practices and support strong environmental policy.

To commemorate the launch of this site, Kennedy joined EcoWatch in Cleveland on Oct. 27 to announce and celebrate the partnership, and news service website. The event took place on the shore of the Cuyahoga River to highlight the role this river played in the birth of the modern-day grassroots environmental movement and passage of the Clean Water Act. It is apropos that EcoWatch, a nonprofit organization dedicated to servicing environmental organizations, is based out of Cleveland along the historic Cuyahoga River.

This website will create lasting and visible change by increasing the number of people educated on environmental issues that impact human health and the environment. As more people are connected to these issues and have the tools to implement change in their lifestyles and community, transformation will occur.

In addition to providing national news of the day, the website will connect users to news in their backyard. The local button on the site connects readers to news specific to their state, giving individuals a strong sense of belonging and caring for their community. EcoWatch is working to enhance the local button and will soon provide hyper-local news for its readers.

EcoWatch is a forum for the exchange of ideas including complex topics such as transitioning to a sustainable energy supply. The combination of aggregated news and original content provides the proper context to ask the difficult questions to help solve these multifaceted problems and find common ground to work from that will ultimately transform our society.

The grassroots environmental movement is at a tipping point. More Americans are concerned about their impact on the Earth and how it affects human health and the environment than ever before. The need to rebuild the economy offers exciting opportunities for job creation that will help solve some of the most daunting environmental problems.

News concerning change in weather patterns, increase in energy costs, excessive use of finite resources, increased energy use of developing nations, higher food costs, droughts, wild fires, oil spills and flooding are just a handful of topics you hear about every day. This site will consolidate the environmental issues impacting these concerns to educate and motivate readers. This news service will build on the momentum of the environmental movement and provide the necessary venue for organizations to promote their work and engage their communities.

I welcome your comments and suggestions regarding this website. Feel free to email me at spear@ecowatch.com.

I hope you enjoy reading the news from the organizations working hard each day to provide a healthy planet for future generations.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

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