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A 17-year periodical cicada. Education Images / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

As many parts of the planet continue to open their doors after pandemic closures, a new pest is expected to make its way into the world. After spending more than a decade underground, millions of cicadas are expected to emerge in regions of the southeastern U.S.

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A paramedic carries a 10-month-old boy with a fever to Stamford Hospital on April 04, 2020 in Stamford, Connecticut. Photo by John Moore / Getty Images
A new health condition seemingly related to COVID-19 related symptoms has appeared in more than 100 children living in New York and New Jersey, prompting health officials to ramp up awareness campaigns and spur new health protocols in response to the mysterious disease.
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The Celebrity Infinity Cruise ship, a wholly owned subsidiary of Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd, returns to PortMiami from a cruise in the Caribbean on March 14, 2020 in Miami, Florida. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

Two of the world's leading cruise lines are facing scrutiny and potential legal consequences due to their handling of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, the coronavirus responsible for the severe respiratory disease COVID-19.

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Honey bees touch their mouthparts and antennae together to share food and information, but the practice also can transmit viruses. Fred Zwicky / University of Illinois

Honey bees guarding the entrances to their respective hives are twice as likely to allow access to virus-infected trespassers, suggesting that the pathogen is capable of altering the insect's behavior and physiology to boost its spread to neighboring colonies.

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Icebergs and sea ice in the waters off the Australian Antarctic Division on Jan.17, 2008. Fairfax Media via Getty Images

For the first time, microscopic plastic pollution has been found in Antarctic sea ice samples collected more than a decade ago, suggesting that microplastic concentrations in Southern Sea ice may be higher than previously believed.

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A black bear in Yosemite National Park in 2009. torhutchins / Flickr

Wild bears in Yosemite National Park are coming out of the woodwork in what park officials are calling a "party" following the park's March 20 closure in response to the novel coronavirus pandemic.

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An approximately one-year-old puma in the streets of Santiago, Chile on March 24, 2020, in search for food as fewer people are outside due to the pandemic. ANDRES PINA / ATON CHILE / AFP via Getty Images

A third cougar has been sighted wandering through a residential neighborhood in the Chilean capital of Santiago as millions of the city's residents are under lockdown measures in response to the coronavirus outbreak.

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The outside of the Food and Drug Administration headquarters in White Oak, Md. on Nov. 9, 2015. Al Drago / CQ Roll Call

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of two malarial drugs to treat and prevent COVID-19, the respiratory infection caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, despite only anecdotal evidence that either is proven effective in treating or slowing the progression of the disease in seriously ill patients.

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A three-dimensional portrait of methane concentrations around the world is helping researchers to understand the complex gas, which constitutes the second largest contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) warming after carbon dioxide.

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A coronavirus awareness sand sculpture at the Bay of Bengal Sea's eastern coast beach in India on March 20, 2020. STR / NurPhoto via Getty Images

As the world continues to cope with the onset of SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the disease COVID-19, there is hope that the virus may follow the suit of similar respiratory illnesses and see a slower spread during the warmer months.

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A bat with white-nose syndrome in Great Smoky Mountains National Park on March 12, 2012. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A deadly fungal disease responsible for the deaths of millions of bats across the U.S. has been confirmed in Texas for the first time.

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