Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Tom Weis

Tom Weis

Tom Weis is a social change agent with 25+ years of environmental and political organizing experience. He currently serves as president of Climate Crisis Solutions, a mission-driven environmental consulting firm. In 2011, Tom led a 2,150-mile “rocket trike” tour from Canada to the Texas Gulf Coast in opposition to TransCanada’s proposed Keystone XL tar sands pipeline. In 2010, he rode 2,500 miles from Boulder, CO to Washington, DC calling for a green energy moon shot for America. Prior to conceiving the Ride for Renewables, Tom spent six years in the wind industry working as a public outreach consultant to enXco, one of the nation’s largest renewable energy companies. During this time, he helped permit 600 MW of wind energy projects and served as Strategic Advisor to the president of the board of the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), where he received AWEA’s 2009 Special Achievement Award for his role in co-creating the American Wind Wildlife Institute

Prior to that, Tom served as National Field Director of Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility, designed and directed a recycling center for the nation’s largest non-profit recycler, and served as Executive Director of the National Forest Protection Alliance. He earlier directed a statewide “Save the Everglades” campaign for Clean Water Action in Florida, playing a key role in launching a multi-million dollar ballot initiative against the sugar industry and generating extensive print, radio and television coverage as campaign spokesperson. Tom also worked on Capitol Hill as an environmental legislative aide to U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-NJ) and directed field operations for presidential campaigns in Iowa and Texas.

Tom is a graduate of the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he earned a B.A. in Environmental Conservation. An avid adventurer and cyclist, he enjoys frequent camping, backpacking, and whitewater float trips throughout the U.S. and abroad. When not pedaling his rocket trike across the country, Tom resides in Boulder, CO.

Australia's dingo fences, built to protect livestock from wild dogs, stretch for thousands of miles. Marian Deschain / Wikimedia

By Alex McInturff, Christine Wilkinson and Wenjing Xu

What is the most common form of human infrastructure in the world? It may well be the fence. Recent estimates suggest that the total length of all fencing around the globe is 10 times greater than the total length of roads. If our planet's fences were stretched end to end, they would likely bridge the distance from Earth to the Sun multiple times.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Hopi blue corn is being affected by climate change. Abrahami / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

Climate change is making ancient Hopi farming nearly impossible, threatening not just the Tribe's staple food source, but a pillar of its culture and religion, the Arizona Republic reports.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Pollution on the Ganges River. Kaushik Ghosh / Moment Open / Getty Images

The most polluted river in the world continues to be exploited through fishing practices that threaten endangered wildlife, new research shows.

Read More Show Less
Oil spills, such as the one in Mauritius in August 2020, could soon be among the ecological crimes considered ecocide. - / AFP / Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

An expert panel of top international and environmental lawyers have begun working this month on a legal definition of "ecocide" with the goal of making mass ecological damage an enforceable international crime on par with war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide.

Read More Show Less
Polar bears are seen in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska. Alan D. Wilson / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

After ongoing pressure from environmental groups and Indigenous communities, Bank of America has said it will not finance any oil and gas exploration in the Arctic, making it the last major U.S. financial institution to do so.

Read More Show Less