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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life
Antarctica's Denman Glacier. NASA

Antarctica's Denman Canyon is the deepest gorge on the Earth's surface, and, if the ice inside it melted, it could raise sea levels by almost five feet.

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Umiamako Glacier enters the ocean in the west of Greenland. E.RIGNOT / NASA

Greenland experienced an unusually warm summer in 2019, which caused the world's largest island to lose 600 billion tons of ice and raised sea levels by 0.2 of an inch, according to a NASA study released yesterday. That amount of ice loss more than doubled Greenland's 2002-2019 annual average.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Orlando Wetlands Park in central Florida. Bkamprath / iStock/ Getty Images Plus

By Kimberly M.S. Cartier

Mangrove forests, marshes and seagrass beds protect inland areas from storm surges and strong winds. Over long periods, coastal wetlands like these build up sediment that mitigates sea level rise and local land subsidence.

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Pekic / E+ / Getty Images

Whether reporting on sea level rise, crop failures, or natural disasters, journalists are often the bearers of bleak news about global warming.

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An iceberg melts off of Greenland. Danita Delimont / Getty Images

The polar ice caps are melting six times faster than they were in the 1990s, the most comprehensive look at the data to date has found.

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Scientists involved in the World Meteorological Organization's report urged world leaders not to lose focus on the climate emergency. Cindy Mariela Lorenzo / World Meteorological Association

The United Nations released a sobering report Tuesday showing that the climate crisis is accelerating global hunger and wreaking havoc on land, sea and in the atmosphere, according to the UN's State of the Climate report.

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Flooding washed away and uprooted many coastal mangrove trees in the southern part of Bangladesh on July 15, 2019. Mohammad Saiful Islam / NurPhoto via Getty Images

By Michael Beck and Pelayo Menéndez

Hurricanes and tropical storms are estimated to cost the U.S. economy more than $50 billion yearly in damage from winds and flooding. And as these storms travel across the Atlantic, they also ravage many Caribbean nations.

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Honolulu beachfront. tpsdave / Pixabay

By Dana Drugmand

Hawaii has officially joined the fight to hold fossil fuel companies accountable for the climate crisis. On Monday the City of Honolulu filed a lawsuit against 10 oil and gas companies, seeking monetary damages to help pay for costs associated with climate impacts like sea level rise and flooding.

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Surfers Paradise, Australia is seen above. Australia could be the country most affected in terms of total coastline lost. Josh Berry-Walker / EyeEm / Getty Images

If nothing is done to lower greenhouse gas emissions, sea level rise could swallow nearly half of the world's sandy beaches by 2100.

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Sea level rise causes water to spill over from the Lafayette River onto Llewellyn Ave in Norfolk, Virginia just after high tide on Aug. 5, 2017. This road floods often, even when there is no rain. Skyler Ballard / Chesapeake Bay Program

By Tim Radford

The Texan city of Houston is about to grow in unexpected ways, thanks to the rising tides. So will Dallas. Real estate agents in Atlanta, Georgia; Denver, Colorado; and Las Vegas, Nevada could expect to do roaring business.

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A coal-fired power station blocks out a sunrise in the UK. sturti / E+ / Getty Images

According to a recent National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) report, the last time carbon dioxide levels were this high was 3 million years ago "when temperature was 2°–3°C (3.6°–5.4°F) higher than during the pre-industrial era, and sea level was 15–25 meters (50–80 feet) higher than today."

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