rivers
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rivers

A view of Lake Powell from Romana Mesa, Utah, on Sept. 8, 2018. DEA / S. AMANTINI / Contributor / Getty Images

By Robert Glennon

Interstate water disputes are as American as apple pie. States often think a neighboring state is using more than its fair share from a river, lake or aquifer that crosses borders.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Lower Granite Dam is obstructing salmon along the Snake River in Washington. Greg Vaughn / VW PICS / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

Climate change, activities that contribute to it, and dams pose grave threats to America's rivers, according to American Rivers.

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waterlust.com / @tulasendlesssummer_sierra .

Each product featured here has been independently selected by the writer. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

The bright patterns and recognizable designs of Waterlust's activewear aren't just for show. In fact, they're meant to promote the conversation around sustainability and give back to the ocean science and conservation community.

Each design is paired with a research lab, nonprofit, or education organization that has high intellectual merit and the potential to move the needle in its respective field. For each product sold, Waterlust donates 10% of profits to these conservation partners.

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An airplane view shows a lake of meltwater in the Greenland ice sheet on August 04, 2019 near Ilulissat, Greenland. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

A new study of Greenland's glacial rivers has important implications for how scientists might model future ice melt and subsequent sea level rise.

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Construction workers prepare to remove the Veazie Dam on the Penobscot River in Orono, Maine, on July 22, 2013. Gordon Chibroski / Portland Press Herald / Getty Images

By Tara Lohan

Atlantic salmon have a challenging life history — and those that hail from U.S. waters have seen things get increasingly difficult in the past 300 years.

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A plastic bag on the beach at Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge in Kiptopeke, Virginia on Oct. 22, 2011. Caitlin Finnerty / Chesapeake Bay Program / Flickr

The state of Virginia is taking a stand against single-use plastics.

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An example of the common dolphins spotted Tuesday in NYC's East River. Tim Melling / Getty Images

In a rare occurrence, New York's East River welcomed unexpected visitors on Tuesday — dolphins.

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This 10-month-old harbor seal had to be put down after being attacked by a dog, despite signs warning people to maintain their distance. Chris Jackson / Getty Images

A seal that had won the hearts of West London had to be put to sleep after a dog attack Sunday.

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Today, 28 populations of West Coast salmon and steelhead are listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act. Digital Vision / Getty Images

By Tara Lohan

It's not too hard to find salmon on a menu in the United States, but that seeming abundance — much of it fueled by overseas fish farms — overshadows a grim reality on the ground. Many of our wild salmon, outside Alaska, are on the ropes — and have been for decades.

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From this overlook 1,400 feet above the the river, one can understand why the New River Gorge is known by many as the Grand Canyon of the East. Sky Noir Photography / Moment / Getty Images

By Mary Caperton Morton

The only thing "new" about West Virginia's New River Gorge is its national park status: In 2021, the New River Gorge became our latest national park, but in geologic terms, the New River is anything but new. Dating back to the days of the supercontinent Pangaea, it is one of the oldest rivers in the world and one of the few waterways in North America that runs north.

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Machines are seen removing sand from the Kuakhai River in Bhubaneswar, India, on November 20, 2020. STR / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Ajit Niranjan

It makes up the concrete of our houses, the tarmac of our roads, the glass in our windows and the silicon chips in our phones.

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Matthew Micah Wright / The Image Bank / Getty Images

By Deborah Moore, Michael Simon and Darryl Knudsen

There's some good news amidst the grim global pandemic: At long last, the world's largest dam removal is finally happening.

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The numbers of migratory freshwater fish such as salmon have declined 76 percent since 1970. Mike Bons / 500px / Getty Images

The latest warning of the Earth's mounting extinction crisis is coming from its lakes and rivers.

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