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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

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EcoWatch is a cutting edge news service promoting the work of more than 1,000 grassroots environmental organizations, activists and community leaders worldwide.

EcoWatch's online news service is honed in on the issues of water, air, food, energy and biodiversity. It promotes ongoing environmental campaigns including climate change, fracking, mountaintop removal, factory farming, sustainable agriculture and renewable energy.

EcoWatch unites the voices of the grassroots environmental movement and mobilize millions of people to engage in democracy in pursuit of a sustainable world.

The site showcases the insights of world-renowned leaders including EcoWatch's advisory board members—Wendy Abrams, Ed Begley, Jr., Paul Berry, Lester Brown, Alexandra Cousteau, Laurie David, Paul Hawken, Randy Hayes, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Phil Radford, Laura Turner Seydel and Harvey Wasserman.

EcoWatch provides news on a global and local scale. Readers can locate news by continent, country or state.

This website is a dedicated and neutral platform for grassroots environmental organizations and activists that helps transform the ability of individuals to learn about environmental issues and take action. This news service provides timely access to relevant information that will motivate individuals to become engaged in their community, adopt sustainable practices and support strong environmental policy.

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The fundamental responsibility of government is to protect the commons—resources that are not readily reduced to private property but by their nature belong to the community—on behalf of all the people. And, the best measure of how a democracy functions is how it distributes the goods of the land. Does it keep the public trust assets, the commons, in the hands of all the people, rich and poor alike, or does it allow them to be privatized and concentrated in the hands of a few wealthy or influential individuals?

If we want to meet our obligation as a generation, a nation, as a civilization to provide our children with the same opportunities for dignity and enrichment as our parents gave us, we must start by protecting our infrastructure, the air we breathe, the water we drink, the wildlife, the public lands that enrich us, that connect us to our past, to our history, that provide context to our communities, that are the source ultimately of our values, our virtues and our character as a people.

The commons are held in trust by the government for the people. They help define us as a community. They underpin our economy and culture and are the source of economic vitality. The first sign of tyranny is government’s complicity in privatizing the commons for private gain. Since the public trust is our community’s life support system, its theft is arguably the gravest threat to human rights.

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

In Germany's Hunsrück village of Schorbach, numerous photovoltaic systems are installed on house roofs, on Sept. 19, 2019. Thomas Frey / Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Germany's target for renewable energy sources to deliver 65% of its consumed electricity by 2030 seemed on track Wednesday, with 52% of electricity coming from renewables in 2020's first quarter. Renewable energy advocates, however, warned the trend is imperiled by slowdowns in building new wind and solar plants.

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In many parts of the U.S., family farms are disappearing and being replaced by suburban sprawl.

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General view of the empty Alma bridge, in front of the Eiffel tower, while the city imposes emergency measures to combat the Coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak, on March 17, 2020 in Paris, France. Edward Berthelot / Getty Images

Half the world is on lockdown. So, the constant hum of cars, trucks, trains and heavy machinery has stopped, drastically reducing the intensity of the vibrations rippling through the Earth's crust. Seismologists, who use highly sensitive equipment, have noticed a difference in the hum caused by human activity, according to Fast Company.

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The current rate of CO2 emissions is a major event in the recorded history of Earth. EPA

By Andrew Glikson

At several points in the history of our planet, increasing amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have caused extreme global warming, prompting the majority of species on Earth to die out.

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The "Earthrise" photograph that inspired the first Earth Day. NASA / Bill Anders

For EcoWatchers, April usually means one thing: Earth Day. But how do you celebrate the environment while staying home to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus?

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