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EcoWatch is a cutting edge news service promoting the work of more than 1,000 grassroots environmental organizations, activists and community leaders worldwide.

EcoWatch's online news service is honed in on the issues of water, air, food, energy and biodiversity. It promotes ongoing environmental campaigns including climate change, fracking, mountaintop removal, factory farming, sustainable agriculture and renewable energy.

EcoWatch unites the voices of the grassroots environmental movement and mobilize millions of people to engage in democracy in pursuit of a sustainable world.

The site showcases the insights of world-renowned leaders including EcoWatch's advisory board members—Wendy Abrams, Ed Begley, Jr., Paul Berry, Lester Brown, Alexandra Cousteau, Laurie David, Paul Hawken, Randy Hayes, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Phil Radford, Laura Turner Seydel and Harvey Wasserman.

EcoWatch provides news on a global and local scale. Readers can locate news by continent, country or state.

This website is a dedicated and neutral platform for grassroots environmental organizations and activists that helps transform the ability of individuals to learn about environmental issues and take action. This news service provides timely access to relevant information that will motivate individuals to become engaged in their community, adopt sustainable practices and support strong environmental policy.

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The fundamental responsibility of government is to protect the commons—resources that are not readily reduced to private property but by their nature belong to the community—on behalf of all the people. And, the best measure of how a democracy functions is how it distributes the goods of the land. Does it keep the public trust assets, the commons, in the hands of all the people, rich and poor alike, or does it allow them to be privatized and concentrated in the hands of a few wealthy or influential individuals?

If we want to meet our obligation as a generation, a nation, as a civilization to provide our children with the same opportunities for dignity and enrichment as our parents gave us, we must start by protecting our infrastructure, the air we breathe, the water we drink, the wildlife, the public lands that enrich us, that connect us to our past, to our history, that provide context to our communities, that are the source ultimately of our values, our virtues and our character as a people.

The commons are held in trust by the government for the people. They help define us as a community. They underpin our economy and culture and are the source of economic vitality. The first sign of tyranny is government’s complicity in privatizing the commons for private gain. Since the public trust is our community’s life support system, its theft is arguably the gravest threat to human rights.

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Catherine Flessen / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

Non-perishable foods, such as canned goods and dried fruit, have a long shelf life and don't require refrigeration to keep them from spoiling. Instead, they can be stored at room temperature, such as in a pantry or cabinet.

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Tero Vesalainen / iStock / Getty Images

By Julia Ries

  • Two flu strains are overlapping each other this flu season.
  • This means you can get sick twice from different flu strains.
  • While the flu vaccine isn't a perfect match, it's the best defense against the flu.

To say this flu season has been abnormal is an understatement.

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Pexels

By Andrew Joseph Pegoda

At least 40 percent to 90 percent of American voters stay home during elections, evidence that low voter turnout for both national and local elections is a serious problem throughout the U.S.

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Arx0nt / Moment / Getty Images

By Alina Petre, MS, RD

Vitamin D, also known as the sunshine vitamin, is a fat-soluble vitamin essential for optimal health.

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Plastic waste that started as packaging clogs tropical landfills. apomares / iStock / Getty Images

By Clyde Eiríkur Hull and Eric Williams

Countries around the world throw away millions of tons of plastic trash every year. Finding ways to manage plastic waste is daunting even for wealthy nations, but for smaller and less-developed countries it can be overwhelming.

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