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Maggie L. Fox

Maggie L. Fox is a veteran of numerous political, environmental and national issue campaigns and has over 30 years of experience mobilizing people to work for progressive change.

She is past National President of America Votes, the former Deputy Executive Director of the Sierra Club, and a consultant to The Energy Future Coalition, Western Resource Advocates, and The Ocean Conservancy. Maggie has consulted with a number of organizations and foundations on their energy and climate campaigns, including The Hewlett Foundation, The UN Foundation, The Western Conservation Foundation, and The Better World Fund. For the past three years, she has been the President and CEO of the Climate Reality Project and CEO of the Climate Reality Action Fund.

As President and CEO of the Climate Reality Project, Maggie has led a campaign to help citizens around the world discover the truth about the climate crisis and take meaningful steps to bring about global change. Along with Chairman and former Vice President Al Gore, Maggie has trained thousands of climate educators from around the world, most recently in Beijing, China, Jakarta, Indonesia, and San Francisco.

Maggie has served on the boards of numerous environmental and women’s organizations. She currently serves on the board of the Green Fund and was honored by the Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment as the 2010 Woman of the Year.

Maggie began her career as a teacher and community organizer on the Navajo and Hopi Reservations of Arizona and New Mexico and worked for the Colorado, North Carolina and Northwest Outward Bound. She earned her B.A. from the University of North Carolina, a Masters in Education from The University of Colorado, and a J.D. with an emphasis in Environmental Law and Native America Natural Resources Law from Northwestern School of Law.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Truth in Action is a day-long global conversation on the climate crisis and how we solve it. The Climate Reality Project

Former Vice President Al Gore kicked off 24 hours of climate talks in the U.S. and 77 other countries around the world Wednesday night.

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Activists highlighted the climate emergency outside Scottish Government headquarters at St Andrew's House in Edinburgh on Oct. 13, 2017. Usage of the term "climate emergency" spiked in 2019, according to Oxford Dictionaries.

By Jessica Corbett

Climate advocates and experts celebrated Oxford Dictionaries' announcement Wednesday that "climate emergency" is the Oxford Word of the Year 2019.

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Using more bamboo for building could slow climate change. kazuend / Unsplash

By Kieran Cooke

There could be a way of countering one key aspect of the climate emergency by making much greater use of a widely-available plant: bamboo building.

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Fossil fueled power plant pictured before a rain. glasseyes view / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

Governments are producing fossil fuels at a rate 120 percent above compliance with Paris agreement goals, a landmark report from the UN Environment Programme found.

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Ten Democratic primary candidates participated in the fifth Democratic debate in Atlanta Wednesday night. Alex Wong / Getty Images

The moderators of the fifth Democratic primary debate in Atlanta Wednesday night only asked one question about the climate crisis, Grist reported Thursday.

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