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Josh Fox

Josh Fox is the founder and producing artistic director of the International WOW Company. Josh has written/directed/produced two feature films and more than twenty five full length works for the stage which have premiered in New York, Asia and Europe.

GASLAND, which Josh wrote, directed and shot, is a film about the largest onshore natural gas drilling campaign in U.S. history which threatens to invade huge areas of the northeastern U.S., including New York city’s watershed. It premiered at theSundance film festival 2010, where it was awarded the 2010 Special Jury Prize for Documentary. In June of 2010, it premiered on HBO to an audience of 3 million homes, was seen by more than 70,000 audience members in its 110 city grassroots tour and has been released by New Video on DVD.  The film was nominated for the Academy Award for best documentary, for four Emmys including best documentary, best directing, best writing and best cinematography,  was  been nominated for best Documentary Screenplay by the WGA, won the  Environmental Media Association Award for best documentary and as a result of Josh’s activism and campaigning on the issue of gas drilling Josh was awarded the 2010 Lennon Ono Grant for Peace by Yoko Ono in a ceremony on John Lennon’s 70th birthday in Reykjavik Iceland this October. As a national spokesman on the issues of the contamination resulting from fossil fuel extraction, Josh has appeared on the Daily Show, The Keith Olbermannshow, PBS Now, CNN, Democracy Now, MSNBC, CBS and NBC Nightly News as well as numerous other TV and radio appearances.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Matt Cardy / Stringer / Getty Images

The Guardian is changing the way it writes about environmental issues.

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Blueberry yogurt bark. SEE D JAN / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Lizzie Streit, MS, RDN, LD

Having nutritious snacks to eat during the workday can help you stay energized and productive.

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A 2017 flood in Elk Grove, California. Florence Low / California Department of Water Resources

By Tara Lohan

It's been the wettest 12 months on record in the continental United States. Parts of the High Plains and Midwest are still reeling from deadly, destructive and expensive spring floods — some of which have lasted for three months.

Mounting bills from natural disasters like these have prompted renewed calls to reform the National Flood Insurance Program, which is managed by Federal Emergency Management Agency and is now $20 billion in debt.

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Jennifer A. Smith / Moment / Getty Images

By Brenda Ekwurzel

When temperatures hit the 80s Fahrenheit in May above latitude 40, sun-seekers hit the parks, lakes, and beaches, and thoughts turn to summer. By contrast, when temperatures lurk in the drizzly 40s and 50s well into flower season, northerners get impatient for summer. But when those 80-degree temperatures visit latitude 64 in Russia, as they just did, and when sleet disrupts Mother's Day weekend in May in Massachusetts, as it just did, thoughts turn to: what is going on here?

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Shrimp fishing along the coast of Nayarit, Mexico. Tomas Castelazo / Wikimedia, CC BY-SA

By Paula Ezcurra and Octavio Aburto

Thousands of hydroelectric dams are under construction around the world, mainly in developing countries. These enormous structures are one of the world's largest sources of renewable energy, but they also cause environmental problems.

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Activists in North Dakota confront pipeline construction activities. A Texas bill would impose steep penalties for such protests. Speak Freely / ACLU

By Eoin Higgins

A bill making its way through the Texas legislature would make protesting pipelines a third-degree felony, the same as attempted murder.

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An Australian flag flutters in the wind in a dry drought-ridden landscape. Virginia Star / Moment / Getty Images

Australia re-elected its conservative governing Liberal-National coalition Saturday, despite the fact that it has refused to cut down significantly on greenhouse gas emissions or coal during its time in power, The New York Times reported.

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Tree lined street, UK. Richard Newstead / Moment / Getty Images

The UK government will fund the planting of more than 130,000 trees in English towns and cities in the next two years as part of its efforts to fight climate change, The Guardian reported Sunday.

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