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Josh Fox

Josh Fox

Josh Fox is the founder and producing artistic director of the International WOW Company. Josh has written/directed/produced two feature films and more than twenty five full length works for the stage which have premiered in New York, Asia and Europe.

GASLAND, which Josh wrote, directed and shot, is a film about the largest onshore natural gas drilling campaign in U.S. history which threatens to invade huge areas of the northeastern U.S., including New York city’s watershed. It premiered at theSundance film festival 2010, where it was awarded the 2010 Special Jury Prize for Documentary. In June of 2010, it premiered on HBO to an audience of 3 million homes, was seen by more than 70,000 audience members in its 110 city grassroots tour and has been released by New Video on DVD.  The film was nominated for the Academy Award for best documentary, for four Emmys including best documentary, best directing, best writing and best cinematography,  was  been nominated for best Documentary Screenplay by the WGA, won the  Environmental Media Association Award for best documentary and as a result of Josh’s activism and campaigning on the issue of gas drilling Josh was awarded the 2010 Lennon Ono Grant for Peace by Yoko Ono in a ceremony on John Lennon’s 70th birthday in Reykjavik Iceland this October. As a national spokesman on the issues of the contamination resulting from fossil fuel extraction, Josh has appeared on the Daily Show, The Keith Olbermannshow, PBS Now, CNN, Democracy Now, MSNBC, CBS and NBC Nightly News as well as numerous other TV and radio appearances.

A boy plays basketball in front of an oil well covered with large colorful flowers and located next to Beverly Hills High School. Wells like this have been hidden throughout Los Angeles. Faces of Fracking / Flickr

While the hazards of fracking to human health are well-documented, first-of-its-kind research from Environmental Health News shows the actual levels of biomarkers for fracking chemicals in the bodies of children living near fracking wells far higher than in the general population.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Sierra Nevada mountains are among the ranges most at-risk for early snowpack melt. CampPhoto / Getty Images

As the planet warms, mountain snowpack is increasingly melting. But "global warming isn't affecting everywhere the same," Climate Scientist Amato Evan told the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego.

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With restaurants and supermarkets becoming less viable options during the pandemic, there has been a growth in demand and supply of local food. Baker County Tourism Travel Baker County / Flickr

By Robin Scher

Beyond the questions surrounding the availability, effectiveness and safety of a vaccine, the COVID-19 pandemic has led us to question where our food is coming from and whether we will have enough.

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Tearing through the crowded streets of Philadelphia, an electric car and a gas-powered car sought to win a heated race. One that mimicked how cars are actually used. The cars had to stop at stoplights, wait for pedestrians to cross the street, and swerve in and out of the hundreds of horse-drawn buggies. That's right, horse-drawn buggies. Because this race took place in 1908. It wanted to settle once and for all which car was the superior urban vehicle. Although the gas-powered car was more powerful, the electric car was more versatile. As the cars passed over the finish line, the defeat was stunning. The 1908 Studebaker electric car won by 10 minutes. If in 1908, the electric car was clearly the better form of transportation, why don't we drive them now? Today, I'm going to answer that question by diving into the history of electric cars and what I discovered may surprise you.

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A technician inspects a bitcoin mining operation at Bitfarms in Saint Hyacinthe, Quebec on March 19, 2018. LARS HAGBERG / AFP via Getty Images

As bitcoin's fortunes and prominence rise, so do concerns about its environmental impact.

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