Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

EcoWatch Expands Website to Reach All Shades of Green

EcoWatch Expands Website to Reach All Shades of Green

For two years, EcoWatch has been reporting on the work of more than 1,000 grassroots environmental organizations worldwide and featuring insights of renowned environmental leaders. Next week EcoWatch will launch a website redesign and expand its content to include two new verticals, EcoLiving and EcoBusiness.

EcoWatch will remain true to its roots and continue to report on the news of the environmental movement and green efforts on college campuses through its EcoNews vertical.

EcoLiving will engage readers who are beginning to connect the dots between human health and the environment, and provide information on greening your home, growing your own food and living a biocentric lifestyle.

EcoBusiness will celebrate social enterprise, feature entrepreneurs and incubators creating the products and green jobs of tomorrow, and promote innovative products that are changing the world. EcoWatch is also launching an online store with thousands of green products to help people lead a healthier and more sustainable lifestyle.

As environmental and health issues become more prevalent, it is the media's duty to inform readers on the most critical issues impacting the planet and the well-being of future generations. EcoWatch will continue to be at the forefront of cutting-edge news that educates and motivates readers to engage in protecting human health and the environment. 

I encourage you to stay connected with EcoWatch by signing up for our Top News of the Day and Most Read News of the Week emails, and liking us on Facebook and following us on Twitter.

Twenty-three years ago I began publishing environmental news to encourage people to become conscious of their impact on the Earth. My goal has always been to reach a broad audience with this message. The expansion of the EcoWatch website will provide the ideal platform to achieve this goal.

Eat Just's cell-based chicken nugget is now served at Singapore restaurant 1880. Eat Just, Inc.

At a time of impending global food scarcity, cell-based meats and seafood have been heralded as the future of food.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

New Zealand sea lions are an endangered species and one of the rarest species of sea lions in the world. Art Wolfe / Photodisc / Getty Images

One city in New Zealand knows what its priorities are.

Dunedin, the second largest city on New Zealand's South Island, has closed a popular road to protect a mother sea lion and her pup, The Guardian reported.

Read More Show Less

Trending


piyaset / iStock / Getty Images Plus

In an alarming new study, scientists found that climate change is already harming children's diets.

Read More Show Less
Wildfires within the Arctic Circle in Alaska on June 4, 2020. Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data processed by Pierre Markuse. CC BY 2.0

By Jeff Masters, Ph.D.

Earth had its second-warmest year on record in 2020, just 0.02 degrees Celsius (0.04°F) behind the record set in 2016, and 0.98 degrees Celsius (1.76°F) above the 20th-century average, NOAA reported January 14.

Read More Show Less

In December of 1924, the heads of all the major lightbulb manufacturers across the world met in Geneva to concoct a sinister plan. Their talks outlined limits on how long all of their lightbulbs would last. The idea is that if their bulbs failed quickly customers would have to buy more of their product. In this video, we're going to unpack this idea of purposefully creating inferior products to drive sales, a symptom of late-stage capitalism that has since been coined planned obsolescence. And as we'll see, this obsolescence can have drastic consequences on our wallets, waste streams, and even our climate.

Read More Show Less