Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Alison Rose Levy

For over two decades, Alison Rose Levy has served as an inquiring journalist, reporting on the health, food and the environment. Since 2012, she has reported on AlterNet. Since 2007 she has contributed blogs to the Huffington Post, in the health, politics, media and green verticals. There she broke the story on fracking in 2009 and has covered it consistently since then, serving as an embedded reporter in the Northeast grassroots environmental movement. In September 2009, Alison began hosting a weekly radio show, which currently is offered as “Connect the Dots,” at Noon on Wednesdays on the Progressive Radio Network.The distinguished guests include Dr. Helen Caldicott, Greg Palast, Harvey Wasserman, Lynne McTaggart, Robert McChesney and Bill McKibben.

Alison is a former television producer and presenter with credits from CBS, PBS, the Odyssey Channel and the Smithsonian Institution. She began her media career by co-founding a national network of independent documentary filmmakers that covered the Three Mile Island nuclear accident, and produced a series of Public Affairs Specials for PBS. The group later evolved into LinkTV. She later worked as a producer of PBS cultural documentaries for the Smithsonian Institution, and in prime time network news television at CBS, before serving as executive producer of Trinity Wall Street's Television program, where she produced The Real Bottom Line for the Odyssey Channel.

Alison is currently completing a book on the intersection between personal health, public health and the environment, aimed at moving health concerned citizens from personal and consumer health choices to social action. An editor/writer/consultant on more than seven trade books, including two New York Times bestsellers, Alison's most recent collaboration is Pathways to Discovery (2010), written with Dr. Amy Yasko, who pioneered a nutrigenomic program for health recovery that is used by over eight thousand families with children with autism.

Alison's beat includes health treatments, the drug and medical industries, health care policy and health science; as well as the federal, state and local regulatory and legal frameworks for the many products, processes, services and industries that affect both health and the environment, which include the food, agriculture, chemical, energy and other industries. As a long-time media professional, Alison also covers stories that reveal how media shapes public attitudes about health, science and the environment.

For more information, contact at Alison Rose Levy via her website www.healthjournalistblog.com on Facebook at Connecting the Dots for Health and on Twiiter @CxtDots and @AlisonRoseLevy.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A view of a washed out road near Utuado, Puerto Rico, after a Coast Guard Air Station Borinquen MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew dropped relief supplies to residents Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. The locals were stranded after Hurricane Maria by washed out roads and mudslides. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Eric D. Woodall / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Coral Natalie Negrón Almodóvar

The Earth began to shake as Tamar Hernández drove to visit her mother in Yauco, Puerto Rico, on Dec. 28, 2019. She did not feel that first tremor — she felt only the ensuing aftershocks — but she worried because her mother had an ankle injury and could not walk. Then Hernández thought, "What if something worse is coming our way?"

Read More
Flooded battery park tunnel is seen after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. CC BY 2.0

President Trump has long touted the efficacy of walls, funneling billions of Defense Department dollars to build a wall on the southern border. However, when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) released a study that included plans for a sea wall to protect New Yorkers from sea-level rise and catastrophic storms like Hurricane Sandy, Trump mocked it as ineffective and unsightly.

Read More
Sponsored
A general view of fire damaged country in the The Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area near the town of Blackheath on Feb. 21, 2020 in Blackheath, Australia. Brook Mitchell / Getty Images

In a post-mortem of the Australian bushfires, which raged for five months, scientists have concluded that their intensity and duration far surpassed what climate models had predicted, according to a study published yesterday in Nature Climate Change.

Read More
Sea level rise causes water to spill over from the Lafayette River onto Llewellyn Ave in Norfolk, Virginia just after high tide on Aug. 5, 2017. This road floods often, even when there is no rain. Skyler Ballard / Chesapeake Bay Program

By Tim Radford

The Texan city of Houston is about to grow in unexpected ways, thanks to the rising tides. So will Dallas. Real estate agents in Atlanta, Georgia; Denver, Colorado; and Las Vegas, Nevada could expect to do roaring business.

Read More
Malala Yousafzai (left) and Greta Thunberg (right) met in Oxford University Tuesday. Wikimedia Commons / CC BY 2.0

What happens when a famous school striker meets a renowned campaigner for education rights?

Read More