Quantcast
Popular
CCGS Amundsen. Wikimedia

Scientific Research Effort in Arctic Cancelled Due to Climate Change

By Andy Rowell

Oh the irony. A scientific expedition examining the effects of climate change has been cancelled because of ... climate change.

The scientific research effort is being led by world leading Arctic specialist, David Barber from the University of Manitoba, who is joined by 40 scientists from five other universities from across Canada.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
The edge of the Filchner-Ronne ice shelf in the Weddell Sea. Ralph Timmermann/AWI

Antarctic Warming Threatens World's Second Largest Ice Shelf

By Tim Radford

German scientists have worked out the process that could destroy an Antarctic ice shelf the size of Iraq.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular

Extreme Arctic Melt Could Increase Sea Level Rise Twice as Fast as Previously Estimated

Extreme Arctic melt could increase global sea level rise twice as fast as previously estimated and cost the world economy between $7 trillion and $90 trillion by 2100, a new analysis shows.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Popular
A 130-metre-wide waterfall drains meltwater from the Nansen Ice Shelf into the ocean. Stuart Rankin via Flickr

Giant Waterfall in Antarctica Worries Scientists

By Tim Radford

Scientists poring over military and satellite imagery have mapped the unimaginable: a network of rivers, streams, ponds, lakes and even a waterfall, flowing over the ice shelf of a continent with an annual mean temperature of more than -50C.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular

Massive Iceberg Hangs by 12-Mile 'Thread'

The growing rift in the Antarctic Peninsula has now lengthened to 110 miles, meaning that the Larsen C ice shelf is now connected to the main ice shelf by only a 12-mile "thread," USA TODAY reports.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
A team from Rutgers University and the University of Georgia, led by Asa Rennermalm of Rutgers, measures meltwater runoff from the ice sheet margin in Greenland during summer 2013. Photo credit: Asa Rennermalm/Rutgers University

Greenland's Coastal Glaciers Rapidly Withering Away

Greenland's icy coastlines are withering away at a rapid pace. With ever rising temperatures in the region, scientists fear the glaciers may never grow back.

A team from Ohio State University discovered that about 20 years ago, melting on the island reached a tipping point. In this event, a layer of old snow called the firn, was frozen over and the ice sheet growth was stunted. This caused the new growth on the coastlines to halt. Combined with rising temperatures of the sea, the ice has been melting away in large sectors. At the rate it's going, the team said there will be a 1.5 inch increase in global sea level rise by 2100.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
Photo credit: Sea Shepherd Conservation Society

Fast and Furious Star Joins Sea Shepherd to Show Impact of Climate Change on Baby Seals

A Sea Shepherd team flew over the Gulf of St. Lawrence last week documenting an ecological disaster that very few people want to talk about—especially those in the Canadian government.

It has been 40 years to the month that French actress Brigitte Bardot first went to the ice floes in Canada to focus attention on the slaughter of baby seals at the behest of Sea Shepherd founder, Captain Paul Watson.

Keep reading... Show less
Photo credit: NASA / Kathryn Hansen

Sea Ice Falls to Record Lows in Both the Arctic and Antarctic

By Roz Pidcock

The Arctic and Antarctic have experienced record lows in sea ice extent so far in 2017, according to the latest data from the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC).

At about this time each year, the Antarctic reaches its lowest extent for the year while the Arctic reaches its highest. The new satellite data, released Wednesday, confirms that there is less sea ice globally than at any time in the entire 38-year satellite record.

The NSIDC doesn't usually release data for both poles simultaneously, but has done so this time because of what scientists have dubbed an "exceptional" year in 2017.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
Shutterstock

63.5º F: Antarctica's New Record High Temp

The World Meteorological Organization announced Wednesday that Antarctica hit a new record high recorded temperature of 63.5 degrees F.

The record, set at an Argentine research base in 2015 and just confirmed by the World Meteorological Organization, breezes past the previous record of 59 degrees.

Meanwhile, real time data released from the National Snow and Ice Data Center showed only 2.131 million square kilometers of sea ice surrounding the continent on Feb. 28—about 159,000 square kilometers less than the record low set in 1997. The Antarctic ice sheet contains 90 percent of the world's freshwater, which would raise sea levels by 200 feet if it were to melt.

For a deeper dive:

Temps: Reuters, USA Today, Gizmodo

Sea ice: Washington Post

Commentary: Forbes, Marshall Shepherd column

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

Sponsored

mail-copy

Get EcoWatch in your inbox