drought
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

drought

A helicopter drops water on burning vegetation as the Bond Fire burns in Silverado, California on Dec. 3, 2020. Mark Rightmire / MediaNews Group / Orange County Register via Getty Images

2020 was the largest wildfire season in California's modern history, according to state agency Cal Fire. And, as the climate crisis continues to increase fire risk, there are concerns that 2021 could be just as devastating.

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Wisconsin DNR fire crews battle a wildfire in Menomonee Falls that burned nearly 450 acres of marshland on Friday, and has since been contained. Wisconsin DNR / Marc Sass, DNR Cooperative Area Forest Ranger

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers declared a state of emergency on Monday due to heightened wildfire risk.

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waterlust.com / @tulasendlesssummer_sierra .

Each product featured here has been independently selected by the writer. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

The bright patterns and recognizable designs of Waterlust's activewear aren't just for show. In fact, they're meant to promote the conversation around sustainability and give back to the ocean science and conservation community.

Each design is paired with a research lab, nonprofit, or education organization that has high intellectual merit and the potential to move the needle in its respective field. For each product sold, Waterlust donates 10% of profits to these conservation partners.

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Wildfires burned across the Midwest and Great Plains over the weekend as dry, windy conditions induced 'Red Flag' warnings across the Central Continental U.S.

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Mount Rushmore National Memorial has been forced to close because of the Keystone Fire and 244 Fire. Jacobs Stock Photography Ltd / Getty Images

Three wildfires raging in South Dakota have shuttered Mount Rushmore and forced hundreds to flee their homes.

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A megadrought worsened by climate change is creating and exacerbating problems across the Western U.S. as NOAA predicts precipitation levels below historical norms through June.

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The upper layers of the Potočani mass burial showing numerous commingled skeletons. J. Balen / copyright by Archaeological Museum in Zagreb

About 6,200 years ago, 41 people were killed and buried in a mass grave in what is now modern-day Croatia. According to Live Science, DNA analysis has now revealed that members of their own community may have murdered them, and some researchers suggest that a sudden population boom or shift in climate conditions could have prompted the mass murder.

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This photo from Sept. 1, 2017, shows Spain on its way to its worst drought in 20 years. The marshes held less than half of the water they can store, with 47.93% of reserves. In Leon, in the north of the country, its main reservoir barely reached 10% at the time. Alvaro Fuente / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

A recent series of summer droughts in Europe, which brought devastating ecological, agricultural, and economic impacts, were more severe than any over the past 2,100 years, new research out Monday finds.

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A person crosses a snowy street in Denver, Colorado on March 14, 2021. Michael Ciaglo / Getty Images

A massive storm dropped feet of snow across Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska over the weekend, knocking out power for tens of thousands of customers and grinding air and ground transportation to a halt.

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Fossilized wood found on Old Faithful's geyser mound suggests that the geyser once stopped erupting long enough for trees to grow there. Ingo Drenberg / EyeEm / Getty Images

In Yellowstone National Park, large crowds watch in awe as Old Faithful erupts with a roar, launching a spire of water about 150 feet in the air.

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A wildfire burns in the Hollywood hills on July 19, 2016 in Hollywood, California. AaronP / Bauer-Griffin / GC Images

California faces another "critically dry year" according to state officials, and a destructive wildfire season looms on its horizon. But in a state that welcomes innovation, water efficacy approaches and drought management could replenish California, increasingly threatened by the climate's new extremes.

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Minimal snow was found at the Phillips Station meadow before the start of the first snow survey of 2018, conducted by the California Department of Water Resources. Kelly M. Grow / Calif. Department of Water Resources

By Tara Lohan

Most of us know a bad drought when we see one: Lakes and rivers recede from their normal water lines, crops wither in fields, and lawns turn brown. Usually we think of these droughts as being triggered by a lack of rain, but scientists also track drought in other ways.

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17-year-old Shreya Ramachandran has already won awards for her research into reusing "grey water." Shreya Ramachandran

By Jeremy Deaton

Shreya Ramachandran, 17, remembers witnessing California's water crisis firsthand on a visit to Tulare County in 2014, when she was still a preteen. Tulare spans a large swath of farmland in California's Central Valley, and at that time, locals were facing dire water shortages amid an ongoing drought made worse by climate change.

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