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United Nations Development Programme

Climate Change, Conflict Leave 224 Million Undernourished in Africa

An official with the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) warns that climate change and conflict are leading to food insecurity for millions of people living in Africa.

"Undernourishment appears to have risen from about 21 percent to nearly 23 percent between 2015 and 2016," Bukar Tijani, FAO's assistant director general for Africa, said Monday at a conference in Sudan.

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Cape Town in South Africa.

3 Things Cities Can Learn from Cape Town’s Impending 'Day Zero' Water Shut-Off

By Betsy Otto and Leah Schleifer

Cape Town is running out of water. After three years of intense drought, South Africa's second-largest city is just a few months away from "Day Zero," the day when the city government will shut off water taps for most homes and businesses.

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Climate

Cape Town Pushes Back 'Day Zero'

“Day Zero," the day drought-stricken Cape Town, South Africa is projected to run out of municipal water, has been moved to mid-May 2018 following a decline in agricultural usage, according to a statement from Alderman Ian Neilson, the city's executive deputy mayor. Day Zero was previously projected to fall on April 16.

Capetonians, however, were urged to continue reducing consumption as "there has not been any significant decline in urban usage," Neilson said. The city's four million residents must continue to use no more than 50 liters of water per person per day.

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Autodesk

Climate Adaptation Is Essential, Scientists Warn

By Tim Radford

The probable changes as the world heats are so great that climate adaptation to cope with the inevitable is now essential, scientists are warning.

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Floods caused power outages at Naval Air Station Sigonella in Italy in 2005. Michael Lavender / U.S. Navy / Flickr

Climate Impacts Nearly Half of U.S. Military Bases

By Alex Kirby

Once more, the administration of President Trump seems puzzled about how seriously—if at all—it should regard how climate effects strike U.S. military abilities.

In December the president listed the global threats he reckoned the U.S. was facing—and climate change didn't get a mention. Now, though, the U.S. Department of Defense says many of its bases are feeling the worrying impacts of climate change.

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Climate

Cape Town's 'Day Zero' Looms as Dam Levels Drop

After three years of unprecedented drought, the South African metropolis of Cape Town is at risk of becoming the first major city in the world to run out of water.

Dam levels fell to 26 percent capacity on Wednesday, compared to 26.3 percent on Monday and 26.6 percent last week. Once the dams reach 13.5 percent, the municipal water supply shuts off for all but essential services, such as hospitals and key commercial areas.

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Climate

Flooding in Paris Becomes 'More and More Recurrent'

A flooded Seine River reached peak flood level early Monday morning following weeks of intense rain that has thoroughly doused Paris.

Authorities reported that the river's flooding peaked at 19.2 feet—just shy of the 20 feet reached in June of 2016, which was its highest level since 1982—and is not expected to recede until Tuesday.

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Molteno Dam Reservoir in Cape Town. Wikimedia Commons

Will Cape Town Become the First Major City to Run Out of Water?

Cape Town is on track to become the first major city in the world to run out of water.

The world-renowned tourist destination—and the second-most populous urban area in South Africa after Johannesburg—could approach "Day Zero," when most taps run dry, by April 21, Mayor Patricia de Lille said Tuesday.

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Politics

Governors Weigh in on Water, Climate and the Environment: What We Know So Far

By Brett Walton

State of the State speeches are where governors sketch their legislative priorities and report on the overall health of their dominions. The state of the state is almost always "strong" and water issues are occasionally mentioned.

Below are summaries of the governors' references to water, climate and the environment.

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