Quantcast
Climate
Irma Omerhodzic

New Pew Survey: Americans Are Noticing the Effects of Climate Change and They Want Action

Significant majorities of Americans are seeing the impacts of climate change on their communities and don't think that the U.S. government is doing enough to combat it, according to the results of the latest survey by the Pew Research Center, reported Monday.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Climate
Lake Mead as seen from the Hoover Dam with a "bathtub ring" showing the water level. Alex Proimos / Flickr / CC BY-NC 2.0

Unprecedented Colorado River Water Shortage Could Be Declared in 2020

After years of unrelenting drought, federal forecasters reported there are better-than-even odds that the nation's largest reservoir will decline into shortage conditions by 2020, forcing Arizona, Nevada and Mexico to reduce their Colorado River water use.

Millions of U.S. residents and farmers are served by the Lake Mead reservoir that's supplied by the Colorado. However, water levels have dropped consistently after years of back-to-back drought. The reservoir is considered full at 1,220 feet above sea level, which has not been seen since 1983.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
Dead trees in the foothills of California's Sierra Nevada mountains following a massive drought. NASA

California Tree Loss Could Have Implications for Forests Nationwide

Climate change puts forests at risk. A recent study found that a third of the conifers in the unique Klamath region in California and Oregon could disappear by the end of this century. California has lost 130 million trees since 2010 due to the combined impacts of drought, warming temperatures and the insects and diseases that accompany them.

Keep reading... Show less
Animals
vil.sandi / Flickr / CC BY-ND 2.0

Sifaka Lemurs Listed as 'Critically Endangered' Amid Mysterious Die-Off

By Edward Carver

Lemurs in Madagascar have been under pressure from deforestation, poaching, drought and other challenges for years. Now, in the much-visited Berenty Reserve near the island's southern tip, one species faces a mysterious new threat.

In the last month and a half, at least 31 Verreaux's sifakas (Propithecus verreauxi) have died in the reserve. Most were found already dead; others were found gravely ill and later died from respiratory failure. Berenty staff and local scientists have reached out to veterinarians and primatologists across the world. The experts believe that a parasite or tick-borne disease is likely to blame, but the exact cause remains unknown.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
Low – or no – water in a drought-stricken Spanish reservoir in 2016. Basotxerri / Wikimedia Commons / CC BY-SA 4.0

3°C May Double Europe’s Drought Risk

By Tim Radford

If average global temperatures rise by just 3°C, then Europe's drought risk could increase to double the area faced with drying out. Right now, just 13 percent of the continent can be counted as a drought-prone region. As the thermometer soars, this proportion could rise to 26 percent.

And 400 million people could feel the heat as the water content in the European soils begins to evaporate. The worst droughts will last three to four times longer than they did in the last decades of the last century.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Animals
More than 70,000 wild horses roam Navajo Nation. Don Graham / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

111 Wild Horses Die in Drought-Ridden Navajo Nation

Drought is being blamed for the deaths of 111 wild horses on Navajo Nation land in northern Arizona, according to tribal officials.

The horses were found dead in a muddy stock pond near Grey Mountain over the past week. The Associated Press reported that animals usually drink from the stock pond but dry conditions left it with little water.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
California floods, March 2017. Kelly M. Grow / California Dept. of Water Resources / Wikimedia Commons

California Faces a Future of Extreme Weather

By Tim Radford

Life is about to become uncomfortable for 40 million people in turbulent California. The citizens of the golden state face a future of extremes, according to new research. The number and severity of floods will grow. But so will the number of extended and severe droughts.

The backcloth to California's climate—the overall annual precipitation–may not change greatly as the world, and the U.S. with it, warms as a consequence of greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion on a global scale.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Climate
Smoke from the Indigo Fire in the Klamath with trees destroyed in the Biscuit Fire in the foreground. Richard Parrish / U.S. Forest Service

Climate Change Threatens Unique West Coast Forest Region

The Klamath is a unique region in Northern California and Southwest Oregon. In addition to being a haven for biodiversity— hosting plants that only live in its mountainous landscape and 29 different species of conifers—it also stores carbon in its diverse array of tall trees.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
Rising carbon dioxide levels could lead to fewer moisture clouds forming over the Amazon rainforest. Ana_Cotta / CC BY 2.0

Climate Change Could Bring Drought to Amazon, Greater Rain to Pacific and African Forests

Scientists have discovered another factor that might interact with rising carbon dioxide emissions to influence climate change—tropical forests.

In a study published in Nature Climate Change Friday, researchers found that the way tropical forests interact with increased atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide could alter rainfall patterns, drying out the Amazon rainforest and increasing precipitation in African and Indonesian forests.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored

mail-copy

The best of EcoWatch, right in your inbox. Sign up for our email newsletter!