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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life
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Drinking regular green tea is a lot like boiling kale and drinking the water. You get some of the nutrients, but most of it goes in the trash. With matcha tea, on the other hand, you consume the whole tea leaves and get all the nutrients. Plus, matcha is more nutrient-dense to begin with.

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To truly get the most out of life, a person needs to be able to get a good night's sleep, which has led many to wonder if there is anything behind the idea of CBD for sleep improvement.

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Like many other plant-based foods and products, CBD oil is one dietary supplement where "organic" labels are very important to consumers. However, there are little to no regulations within the hemp industry when it comes to deeming a product as organic, which makes it increasingly difficult for shoppers to find the best CBD oil products available on the market.

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Ethics Statement

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At EcoWatch, we provide readers with honest and unbiased news. To do this we hire the best writers and editors we can to cover an intensifying climate crisis. But good journalism costs money. We believe a writer should be compensated fairly for her work. That's why we have chosen to generate revenue through advertisements and affiliate content.

Below is an outline of our business and how we support the editorial independence of our coverage:

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What follows are details on our revenue sources and the policies we have in place to maintain the integrity of our news coverage, which is the heart of our publication.

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On-site ads are managed by third-party services. We make space available on our site and a third-party places relevant content in those places. We have no connection to these advertisers and they do not influence our work. We hope to grow other streams of revenue so we can scale back the number of display ads on our site. The experience of our readers is important to us.

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Mass consumption is harmful to our planet. In a perfect world everyone would own less and drastically reduce their waste. We understand this. We also know people are going to buy food items, supplements, home services, and basic goods every day. We think if we help optimize even some of these purchases toward more sustainable options we can make a difference.

That's why we write about the best options we find. It's why, at times, we'll write about the lesser of evils. We want our readers to be aware of the choices they make in a variety of product and service categories.

In our reviews and guides there are affiliate links. When a reader clicks an affiliate link and makes a purchase, we can earn a commission. We point readers to the best and most useful sites, brands, and shops our writers can find. We keep the writers separate from any business relationships so their recommendations remain unbiased.

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Sponsor Content is created by advertisers. We allow these advertisers to write their own articles and we publish them as the work and opinion of that advertiser. This content does not reflect the opinions of EcoWatch or our employees. Readers will see that when we publish sponsor content it is labeled "Sponsored" and housed in a directory of that title on our website.

Our policy requires all advertisers provide a logo and/or brand name to accompany their sponsor content. We believe this will make it clearer to readers who purchased the placement and wrote the article.

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Our journalists do not create advertising content. They are not aware of or regularly updated on the growth of a particular revenue channel. They are here to clarify the most pressing issue of our time through honest, clear, researched reporting. They will never take payments to talk about subjects that pose a conflict of interest or accept gifts or money for influence.

Media is in a new era. Content and commerce occupy the same screen. Our team will do everything we can to make this work in a way that is ethical, fair, and at the service of our readers.

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Affiliate Disclosure

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Updated: November 23, 2020

This Affiliate Compensation Disclosure is provided by EcoWatch, together with its affiliates, including, without limitation, both mobile and online versions of our websites (collectively, referred to herein as the "Site"), and is provided for the purpose of disclosing the Site's financial relationship with affiliates, advertisers, sponsors and other third parties that appear on the Site (collectively, referred to herein as "Affiliates"), pursuant to the Federal Trade Commission's Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsement and Testimonials in Advertising, 16 C.F.R. Part 255.

This Affiliate Compensation Disclosure has been posted on the Site or has otherwise been linked to in a post or article since the Site sells and thus receives monetary and other forms compensation from Affiliates for various advertising, sponsorships, insertion orders and promotional campaigns that we feature on the Site. Thus, there is a paid connection between some of the products or services mentioned, reviewed or recommended on this Site and the Affiliate (i.e., the owner of that third party product or service). If you ultimately decide to purchase such a product or service mentioned on the Site, the Site may receive additional compensation from that purchase from the Affiliate.

Further, the Site posts or otherwise promotes content, including editorial content, which may feature third party products and services (the "Affiliate Products") and which may link to third party owned and operated web sites where you can purchase Affiliate Products. If you click on a link to an Affiliate's Product on the Site and then follow the link to purchase an Affiliate Product on the Affiliate's web site, the Site may receive compensation from the Affiliate offering the Affiliate Product. Weblinks on the Site featuring Affiliate Product(s) may be added to articles that are not identified on the Site as paid or sponsored content. A disclosure statement about the Affiliate Product(s) and the possible compensation will always be included in those articles. Also, you may see third party ads posted on the Site. Each time you click on such an ad, we will receive compensation from the third party advertiser, even if you do not purchase something from the third party.

Even though we may receive compensation in connection with your purchase of Affiliate Products as outlined above, we still seek to provide our honest opinions, findings, beliefs, and experiences as they relate to the products and services that are featured on the Site.

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kazmulka / iStock / Getty Images

According to the National Eczema Foundation, roughly 31.6 million people have some form of eczema. The symptoms of this condition include itchiness, discoloration, and dry skin. In the past, harsh steroidal creams were the gold standard for eczema treatment. But there's got to be a more effective way to heal the skin, right?

Thankfully, we're out of the dark ages and into an all-natural era of skin care. Today, alternative therapies abound, including clinically-tested cannabis ointments and DIY home remedies like oatmeal baths.

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File:Rhodiola kirilowii-IMG 3650.jpg - Wikimedia Commons

Unfortunately, you'd be hard pressed to find a person who doesn't deal with stress on at least a somewhat regular basis. Whether it has to do with money, work, relationships, or something else entirely, stress can take a toll on both our physical and mental wellbeing.

For those who are unable to get a handle on it, it can often result in unhealthy coping mechanisms and behaviors. On top of that, it can lead to detrimental effects on our physical and mental health, like depression, insomnia, high blood pressure, a weakened immune system, and much more.

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Pexels
Why is echinacea still one of America's most widely-used natural remedies? Because studies show that it can have profound effects on the immune system. But that's not all.
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File:Ashwagandha.jpg - Wikimedia Commons

In India, practitioners of traditional Ayurvedic medicine refer to ashwagandha as "the strength of the stallion" due to its powerful ability to revive the immune system following illness. But that just scratches the surface of what ashwagandha can do.

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Pixabay

According to a 2017 report published in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology, you shouldn't drink more 300-400 mg of caffeine a day. In other words, roughly 2-4 cups of coffee.

With that said, everyone responds to caffeine differently. For some, a daily caffeine intake of 200 mg could be excessive—it all depends on your unique body chemistry. But how can you tell how much caffeine is too much?

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