Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Senate Democrats Unveil Energy Bill to Signal 'Full-Throated Support' of Obama's 'Aggressive' Climate Plan

Climate
Senate Democrats Unveil Energy Bill to Signal 'Full-Throated Support' of Obama's 'Aggressive' Climate Plan

A group of Senate Democrats unveiled an energy bill today, which follows a proposal that came out of the House Energy and Commerce Committee in July. The bill aims to end some subsidies for fossil fuels and close some oil and gas tax loopholes, incentivize renewable energy such as solar and wind through grant programs and tax incentives, and encourage carbon capture and sequestration, nuclear and biofuels, according to the nonprofit Friends of the Earth.

The New York Times reports, though the bill "has no chance of passage in the Republican-controlled Congress," it's “intended to signal [Democrat's] full-throated support of President Obama’s aggressive climate change agenda to 2016 voters and to the rest of the world." The bill, announced by Senate Democratic party leaders and the energy committee's top Democrat, Sen. Maria Cantwell, "laid out the party's vision for cutting emissions at least 34 percent by 2025," according to Reuters. That's a cut even larger than the target set by the Obama administration.

"Congress must put forward a vision for how we can transition to a clean energy economy," said Friends of the Earth Climate and Energy Director Ben Schreiber. "Our country must lead the world in the fight against climate change. Unfortunately, the time has passed for half-measures. Extending subsidies for renewables and ending Big Oil giveaways are important steps, but we cannot afford to throw our tax dollars after false solutions."

The bill was introduced today in the Senate just hours before the Pope is expected to arrive in Washington, DC. Pope Francis has become an outspoken advocate for strong action on climate change and media reports indicate that he plans to use his first-ever visit to the U.S. to hone in on his climate message. He will deliver an address to Congress on Thursday before heading to New York on Friday to speak to the UN General Assembly.

While many prominent conservatives have attacked the Pope for his views on climate change, 11 Republican members of Congress called for climate action last week, introducing a resolution that put the climate challenge in the broader context of conservation, stewardship, innovation and conservatism.

“If Congress is interested in a responsible energy plan for American families that cuts carbon pollution, invests in the booming clean energy economy and finally tackles the challenge posed by global climate disruption, they should start with this bill," said Sierra Club legislative director Melinda Pierce.

"This legislation offers a bold, ambitious vision for growing our clean energy economy and tackling the climate crisis, and the Sierra Club commends Senator Cantwell and Senate Democratic leadership for their dedication to bringing this legislation to the American people. While there is much left to do, this bill constitutes a powerful step toward an America powered by safer energy choices that will create jobs, keep our air and water clean and take action to help curb the climate crisis.”

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Climate Deniers Attack ‘Rock Star’ Pope as ‘Nature-Worshipping Pagan’ Amid U.S. Visit

Stephen Colbert Explains Why Bernie Sanders Is Rocking Rallies All Over the Country

Koch Brothers: Apocalyptical Forces of Ignorance and Greed, Says RFK Jr.

#BearSelfies Force Colorado Park to Close

A 3-hour special film by EarthxTV calls for protection of the Amazon and its indigenous populations. EarthxTV.org

To save the planet, we must save the Amazon rainforest. To save the rainforest, we must save its indigenous peoples. And to do that, we must demarcate their land.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres delivers a video speech at the high-level meeting of the 46th session of the United Nations Human Rights Council UNHRC in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 22, 2021. Xinhua / Zhang Cheng via Getty Images

By Anke Rasper

"Today's interim report from the UNFCCC is a red alert for our planet," said UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.

The report, released Friday, looks at the national climate efforts of 75 states that have already submitted their updated "nationally determined contributions," or NDCs. The countries included in the report are responsible for about 30% of the world's global greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less

Trending

New Delhi's smog is particularly thick, increasing the risk of vehicle accidents. SAJJAD HUSSAIN / AFP via Getty Images

India's New Delhi has been called the "world air pollution capital" for its high concentrations of particulate matter that make it harder for its residents to breathe and see. But one thing has puzzled scientists, according to The Guardian. Why does New Delhi see more blinding smogs than other polluted Asian cities, such as Beijing?

Read More Show Less
A bridge over the Delaware river connects New Hope, Pennsylvania with Lambertville, New Jersey. Richard T. Nowitz / Getty Images

In a historic move, the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) voted Thursday to ban hydraulic fracking in the region. The ban was supported by all four basin states — New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York — putting a permanent end to hydraulic fracking for natural gas along the 13,539-square-mile basin, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

Read More Show Less
Woodpecker

Colombia is one of the world's largest producers of coffee, and yet also one of the most economically disadvantaged. According to research by the national statistic center DANE, 35% of the population in Columbia lives in monetary poverty, compared to an estimated 11% in the U.S., according to census data. This has led to a housing insecurity issue throughout the country, one which construction company Woodpecker is working hard to solve.

Read More Show Less