Quantcast

Go Solar at Best Buy

Business

For people in five states, going solar is now as easy as buying a Blu-Ray movie or a laptop accessory.

Best Buy and SolarCity announced a partnership Wednesday that allows the big-box retailer to sell the solar energy firm's services in about 60 stores. SolarCity is known as the nation's largest residential solar power provider.

A partnership between SolarCity and Best Buy allows shoppers to go solar with in-store estimates. Photo credit: SolarCity

"People go to Best Buy to buy all sorts of devices and appliances, and almost everything you buy consumes a tremendous amount of electricity—your flat-screen TV, your dishwasher," SolarCity CEO Lyndon Rive told the Los Angeles Times. "Now we can sell a product that addresses those energy needs."

The in-store SolarCity employees will provide estimates for solar panel installation, as well as information on potential savings what the system would look like on a customer's home.

For now, the stores are located in five of the more progressive states when it comes to solar energy—Arizona, California, Hawaii, New York and Oregon. Four of those five states were ranked in the Solar Energy Industries Association's ranking of the top solar states in the country.

Clearly, demand is high in these states, which also makes for a strong solar workforce. All five states ranked in The Solar Foundation's top 20 states in terms of solar jobs.

Rive likened buying solar energy at Best Buy to purchasing a new phone plan. The two companies have already launched a joint website to provide free consultation. They are also offering $100 Best Buy gift cards to those who sign up for solar service in a participating store prior to Earth Day.

"The services we offer, it tends to be a conversational sale," he said. "Meaning most people don't understand the value proposition until they spend two or three minutes listening to it and the value proposition is cheaper, cleaner energy."

In December, SolarCity launched an initiative to bring solar energy to schools around the world that don't have electricity. SolarCity launched the Give Power Foundation by partnering with buildOn, a nonprofit that has builds schools in underdeveloped communities around the world. The two entities began the program with a focus on schools in Haiti, Mali, Malawi and Nepal.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A group of wind turbines in a field in Banffshire, Northeast Scotland. Universal Images Group / Getty Images

Scotland produced enough power from wind turbines in the first half of 2019, that it could power Scotland twice over. Put another way, it's enough energy to power all of Scotland and most of Northern England, according to the BBC — an impressive step for the United Kingdom, which pledged to be carbon neutral in 30 years.

Read More Show Less
Beekeeper Jeff Anderson works with members of his family in this photo from 2014. He once employed all of his adult children but can no longer afford to do so. CHRIS JORDAN-BLOCH / EARTHJUSTICE

By Jessica A. Knoblauch

It's been a particularly terrible summer for bees. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it is allowing the bee-killing pesticide sulfoxaflor back on the market. And just a few weeks prior, the USDA announced it is suspending data collection for its annual honeybee survey, which tracks honeybee populations across the U.S., providing critical information to farmers and scientists.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less

tommaso79 / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Rachel Licker

As a new mom, I've had to think about heat safety in many new ways since pregnant women and young children are among the most vulnerable to extreme heat.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Kris Gunnars, BSc

It's easy to get confused about which foods are healthy and which aren't.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Maximum heat indices expected in the continental U.S. on Saturday July 20. NOAA WPC

A dangerous heat wave is expected to boil much of the Central and Eastern U.S. beginning Wednesday, The Washington Post reported.

Read More Show Less
Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, who was appointed by President Gerald Ford in 1975, was presented with the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama on May 29, 2012. MANDEL NGAN / AFP / GettyImages

John Paul Stevens, the retired Supreme Court Justice who wrote the opinion granting environmental agencies the power to regulate greenhouse gases, died Tuesday at the age of 99. His decision gave the U.S. government important legal tools for fighting the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler signs the so-called Affordable Clean Energy rule on June 19, replacing the Obama-era Clean Power Plan that would have reduced coal-fired plant carbon emissions. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency / Twitter

By Elliott Negin

On July 8, President Trump hosted a White House event to unabashedly tout his truly abysmal environmental record. The following day, coincidentally, marked the one-year anniversary of Andrew Wheeler at the helm of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), first as acting administrator and then as administrator after the Senate confirmed him in late February.

Read More Show Less