Quantcast

Christian Group Gives Coal-Loving Australian Prime Minister 'Clean Energy 4 Christmas'

Climate

In the last year, Australia has earned a lamentable reputation as a country going rapidly backward on addressing climate change. After Tony Abbott was elected prime minister in 2013, his huge man crush on coal impacted the country in numerous ways, as it repealed its carbon taxdumped its Renewable Energy Target and gave encouragement to big new environment-destroying, greenhouse gas-emitting coal projects. It dragged its feet on contributing to the Green Climate Fund, saying it wouldn't do so and then finally making a pledge during the recent climate summit in Peru.

Members of Common Grace deliver a green holiday gift to coal-loving Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott. Photo credit: Common Grace

But some Australians aren't taking this lying down. A group called Common Grace, who describe themselves as "thousands of Christians from various denominations who are passionate about Jesus and justice," have been collecting donations to buy solar panels for Kirribilli House, Australia's equivalent of the White House. And they announced last week that they have met their goal of $6,000, crowdfunding the 12 panels in just four days.

"The solar panels are a gift for the nation, from the nation, to symbolize public support for a clean energy future," said Common Grace participant the Rev. Dr. Michael Frost. "We know that 89 percent of Australians support a strong Renewable Energy Target. By giving solar panels to Kirribilli House, Christians are adding their voice to a chorus of Aussies who want to see a vibrant renewables industry. Our message to the Prime Minister is: don’t knock renewables until you've tried them."

A group of Christian leaders delivered the gift with a Christmas card to staff members who promised to pass it along to Abbott. And Solar Council, the association for Australia's solar industry, offered to install them for free.

“As we all know, solar panels need to be professionally installed," said Solar Council CEO John Grimes. "Therefore the Solar Council is adding to this gift. We will install the solar panels at Kirribilli House for free."

A Christmas card delivered to Prime Minister Tony Abbott hints at what needs to be done to protect the Earth. Photo credit: Common Grace

“We've just launched Common Grace and we’re learning what it looks like to live out the beauty, generosity and justice we see in Jesus as the earth heats up at an unprecedented rate," said Common Grace's climate justice campaigner Jody Lightfoot. "We’re learning what it means to love our neighbors who are at the front lines of climate change and how we can be stewards of the earth in the face of our ecological crisis,” he said.

Jacqui Remond, director of Catholic Earthcare Australia and part of the delegation that delivered the gift, added, “As Christians, we recognize that the Earth is a gift and I want to pass on a clean energy future to our children and grandchildren climate change isn't just an environmental issue—it’s a matter of justice. It’s about people in poverty, particularly indigenous populations, who are being hit first and hardest for what they've contributed to least. It’s also about Australians who are preparing to face more intense and frequent bushfires as we approach what could be the hottest summer on record."

What better Christmas gift could their be than protecting the planet? Photo credit: Common Grace

If the prime minister declines the panel, Common Grace said they'll be offered to the Davidson Brigade of the Rural Fire Service of which Prime Minister Abbott is a long time member.

"Fire fighters are on the front line of climate change fighting increasingly frequent and intense bushfires," the group said. "It’d be a small way we can say thank you for what they do."

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Australia Becomes First Nation to Repeal Carbon Tax

Man-Made Climate Change Guilty of Causing Australia's Hottest Year

Australian Prime Minister Attempts to Undermine Global Climate Action

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The first day of the Strike WEF march on Davos on Jan. 18, 2020 near Davos, Switzerland. The activists want climate justice and think the WEF is for the world's richest and political elite only. Kristian Buus / In Pictures via Getty Images

By Ashutosh Pandey

Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg is returning to the Swiss ski resort of Davos for the 2020 World Economic Forum with a strong and clear message: put an end to the fossil fuel "madness."

Read More
Protesters attend a rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court held by the group Our Children's Trust Oct. 29, 2018 in Washington, DC. The group and the plaintiffs have vowed to keep fighting and to ask the full Ninth Circuit to review Friday's decision to toss the lawsuit. Win McNamee / Getty Images

An appeals court tossed out the landmark youth climate lawsuit Juliana v. United States Friday, arguing that the courts are not the place to resolve the climate crisis.

Read More
Sponsored
The land around Red Knoll near Kanab, UT that could have been razed for a frac sand mine. Tara Lohan

By Tara Lohan

A sign at the north end of Kanab, Utah, proclaims the town of 4,300 to be "The Greatest Earth on Show."

Read More
A worker sorts out plastic bottles for recycling in Dong Xiao Kou village. China also announced Sunday that it would work to promote the use of recycled plastics. FRED DUFOUR / AFP via Getty Images

China, the world's No. 1 producer of plastic pollution, announced major plans Sunday to cut back on the sale and production of single-use plastics.

Read More
Catherine Flessen / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

Non-perishable foods, such as canned goods and dried fruit, have a long shelf life and don't require refrigeration to keep them from spoiling. Instead, they can be stored at room temperature, such as in a pantry or cabinet.

Read More