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NASA is advancing tools like this supercomputer model that created this simulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to better understand what will happen to Earth's climate if the land and ocean can no longer absorb nearly half of all climate-warming CO2 emissions. NASA/GSFC

By Jeff Berardelli

For the past year, some of the most up-to-date computer models from the world's top climate modeling groups have been "running hot" – projecting that global warming may be even more extreme than earlier thought. Data from some of the model runs has been confounding scientists because it challenges decades of consistent projections.

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The Energy Vault uses gravity to store excess energy. Energy Vault Inc. youtu.be

Storing large amounts of energy is key to using more renewable energy because the wind does not always blow and the sun does not always shine.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Oregon-based nonprofit Friends of Trees help to plant trees in Portland's low-income neighborhoods. youtu.be

On hot summer days, trees help cool city neighborhoods. And during extreme storms, they help absorb stormwater and reduce flooding.

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This year, the Call for Code is seeking solutions for two of the world's most pressing problems: COVID-19 and climate change. Cavan Images / Getty Images

Technology can serve any purpose, including the greater good. That inspired entrepreneur David Clark to start an annual competition, the Call for Code Global Challenge.

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Anishinaabe tribes in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan are adapting to climate change in the Northwoods (pictured) by prioritizing relationship-building and observation of the land. Matthew Crowley Photography / Getty Images

By Samantha Harrington

If the forests of northern Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan keep secrets, it's only because people fail to listen. For about 500 years, since they moved to the region from the Northeastern U.S. and Canada, Anishinaabe tribes have built relationships and history with all beings in the region – from tall trees and moose to grains of sand and manidoonsag, which means "little spirits" in Ojibwe. Elders and tribal members who have taken the time to observe the landscape have witnessed their community members, both human and otherwise, adapt to harsh winters, wildfires, storms, pest outbreaks, and the arrival of Europeans.

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Mangrove Action Project video

Along many tropical shorelines, swampy mangrove forests create habitat for fish and buffer the impact of heavy waves.

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As restoration managers repair damaged corals, sound recordings can help jumpstart the process of restoring vibrant – and noisy – coral reef ecosystems. CC by 2.0

A healthy coral reef is a noisy place.

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Jackson Family Wines in California discovered that a huge amount of carbon pollution was caused by manufacturing wine bottles. Edsel Querini / Getty Images

Before you pour a glass of wine, feel the weight of the bottle in your hand. Would you notice if it were a few ounces lighter? Jackson Family Wines is betting that you won't.

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Harmful algal blooms, seen here at Ferril Lake in Denver, Colorado on June 30, 2016, are increasing in lakes and rivers across the U.S. Helen H. Richardson / The Denver Post / Getty Images

During summer in central New York, residents often enjoy a refreshing dip in the region's peaceful lakes.

But sometimes swimming is off-limits because of algae blooms that can make people sick.

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On average, there are more heat-related deaths in the U.S. each year than hurricane- or flood-related fatalities combined.
fotograzia / Getty Images

By Sara Peach

When your body gets too hot, you may experience a heat-related illness such as heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Such illnesses can be dangerous. In fact, on average, there are more heat-related deaths in the U.S. each year than hurricane- or flood-related fatalities combined.

But heat exhaustion and heat stroke are preventable. Read on for some do's and don'ts.

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David Abazs, a farmer in northeastern Minnesota, has created a site-specific farming calendar based solely on natural events. youtu.be

As the climate warms, growing seasons are becoming more erratic. That uncertainty makes it harder for farmers to decide when to plant and harvest crops.

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