Quantcast
With well over a billion cars worldwide, electric vehicles are still only a small percentage. An economist from the University of Michigan Energy Institute says that is likely to change. Maskot / Getty Images

In 2018, there were about 5 million electric cars on the road globally. It sounds like a large number, but with well over a billion cars worldwide, electric vehicles are still only a small percentage.

Read More
Scene from a performance in the 'Science Collaboration' series. Todd Nicewonger / Courtesy of Daniel Bird Tobin


In a theater at Virginia Tech, audience members are invited to stand with their eyes closed and imagine themselves on a beach, wading into the ocean.


But then this relaxing visualization takes a turn. Their guide, performer Daniel Bird Tobin, asks them to imagine they're still standing in water, but not on the beach. They're in floodwater that has inundated the university drill field, bookstore and graduate center –

"all places where, on a hundred-year flood scenario, you could have waist-deep water," Tobin says.

His presentation, called "Flooding the Beach," is based on maps and data by Virginia Tech researcher Peter Sforza.

It's part of a larger effort to help people connect with science in a more visceral way.

"I think people learn, truly learn, on a deep level when they're able to find a personal connection to research," Tobin says. "And poster presentations are fantastic at getting a lot of clear data out there, but sometimes when you are able to use performance or other art forms to communicate science, people can find an emotional hook that brings them into the work."

So Tobin aims to get people's bodies, emotions and minds engaged with climate science.

Reposted with permission from Yale Climate Connections.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Knox College students in the course 'Examining the Anthropocene' planting a rain garden to control water runoff. Knox College / Peter Bailley / Yale Climate Connections

Last spring, students at Knox College in Illinois traded their notebooks for shovels and planted a rain garden on campus. The garden is not just a bunch of pretty plants. It's designed to reduce stress on the campus drainage system during heavy rain.

Read More
White Rhinoceros at the Detroit Zoo in Royal Oak, Michigan on May 26, 2018. Rhinos, as well as giraffes and zebras are generating what the zoo calls "poo power." Raymond Boyd / Getty Images

By Diana Madson

At the Detroit Zoo, giraffes, rhinos, and zebras not only fascinate visitors — they also generate what the zoo calls "poo power."

Read More
Aerial view of Cancun coastline. Dronepicr / Wikipedia / CC BY 3.0

Buying insurance is one way to protect something of value, such as a car or a home. And now businesses in Cancun, Mexico, have insured a coral reef.

Read More
Pump Train in Cranberry Street Tunnel after Hurricane Sandy. MTA New York City Transit / Leonard Wiggins / Wikimedia

In 2012, Superstorm Sandy wreaked havoc on New York City's transportation system. Storm surge pushed a flood of seawater into vehicle tunnels, railyards, ferry terminals, and subway lines.

Read More
Sponsored
Light breaking through the cloud and catching the monsoon rains over the vast plains surrounding Tucson, Arizona. john finney photography / Moment / Getty Images

By Molly Matthews Multedo

Not much rain falls in the desert city of Tucson, Arizona. And as the climate warms, it's getting even drier. So when it does rain, it pays — literally — to make the most of it.

Read More
Ocean clouds seen from space. NASA / Unsplash

Natural gas consists mainly of methane, a potent global warming pollutant.

Read More
One of the 25 new Long Beach Transit hybrid gasoline-electric buses on April 23, 2009. Jeff Gritchen / Digital First Media / Orange County Register / Getty Images

In Long Beach, California, some electric buses can charge along their route without cords or wires.

When a bus reaches the Pine Avenue station, it parks over a special charging pad. While passengers get on and off, the charger transfers energy to a receiver on the bottom of the bus.

Read More
A U.S. Border Patrol agent gathers personal effects from immigrants before they are transferred to a McAllen processing center on July 02, 2019 in Los Ebanos, Texas. John Moore / Getty Images

Poverty and violence in Central America are major factors driving migration to the United States. But there's another force that's often overlooked: climate change.

Read More

Wind whipping across the Great Plains can generate a lot of electricity. But transporting that electricity from remote areas to cities and towns can be a big task.

Read More
Sponsored