Gable Roof Cost and Homeowners Guide [2022]

Average Gable Roof Cost : $5,950- $11,220 for materials

  • Gable roofs have excellent snow and water drainage but are not suitable for locations with high winds
  • Gable roofs can be energy-efficient if you choose the right roofing material and insulation 
  • On average, the price per square foot for a gable roof costs between $3.50 to $6.60

This EcoWatch guide to sustainable roofing has helped thousands of homeowners like you find the right roof for their needs, which saves them time and money in the process. 

Ecowatch Author Alora Rands

By Alora Rands

Updated 11/21/2022

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A gable roof is a steep or pitched roof that has two sides (gable walls) that come together at the top of a home to make a triangle. As one of the most popular roof styles in the US., this roof is a popular choice for boosted curb appeal. 

Gable roofs can be built from nearly every roofing material available, which allows for customization and budget control. This roof style is also ideal for solar panels and has excellent ventilation that often improves the energy efficiency of your home.

There are so many ways to design a gable roof, so if you are interested in this style of roofing, reach out to a local roofing company for a personalized estimate for your roof replacement.

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Power Home

  • Pros icon Positive industry reputation
  • Pros icon Lifetime or lengthy warranty
  • Pros icon 10+ years of experience
  • Pros icon Positive customer reviews
  • Pros icon Uses eco-friendly materials
  • Pros icon Well-trained, certified installers
  • Pros icon Variety of roofing styles available
  • Con icon Limited variety of roofing materials
  • Con icon Short or nonexistent warranty
  • Con icon No financing information available
  • Con icon Expensive
  • Con icon Little information available on company website
Best for New Roofs
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Erie Metal Roofs

  • Pros icon Lifetime or lengthy warranty
  • Pros icon Widespread availability
  • Pros icon 10+ years of experience
  • Pros icon Positive customer reviews
  • Pros icon Uses eco-friendly materials
  • Pros icon Financing options available
  • Pros icon Well-trained, certified installers
  • Pros icon Uses durable materials meant to last
  • Pros icon Variety of roofing styles available
  • Con icon Limited variety of roofing materials
  • Con icon Expensive
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Aspen Contracting

  • Pros icon Positive industry reputation
  • Pros icon Lifetime or lengthy warranty
  • Pros icon Widespread availability
  • Pros icon 10+ years of experience
  • Pros icon Positive customer reviews
  • Pros icon Financing options available
  • Con icon Little information available on company website

Jump To: Cost of Installing a Gable Roof | Factors That Go Into Gable Roof Pricing | Pros and Cons of Installing Gable Roofs | Lifetime and Durability of Gable Roofs | Are Gable Roofs Environmentally Friendly? | Financing Your New Gable Roof | Cost of Maintenance and Repairs for Gable Roofs | Cost of Cleaning Your Gable Roof | Are Gable Roofs Worth the Cost? | FAQ: Gable Roof

Cost of Installing a Gable Roof 

The average cost to install a 1,700-square-foot gable roof starts between $5,950 and $11,220 for materials. At just $3.50 to $6.60 per square foot, gable roofs are one of the more affordable roof styles. This estimated cost is entirely dependent on the material you use, so keep in mind that this number can vary by material and where you live. 

Along with your materials, you’ll also have to pay for labor. Because the cost of labor often ranges between $1.50 and $3.00 per square foot, you can expect to pay between $2,550 and $5,100 minimum for your construction crew. 

The amounts listed above are based on national averages, so the total cost of your gable roof may differ. For an estimate personalized to your roof, contact your local roofing company for a free quote.

How to Calculate the Cost of Your New Gable Roof

To get a ballpark estimate of the cost of your roof replacement, all you need to do is multiply the average costs of a gable roof by the square footage of your roof. For the average costs, use the range we listed above. As for your roof’s size, you can find the approximate square footage if you:

  • Review your home’s blueprints
  • Ask neighbors with similar home sizes what the size of their roof is
  • Use the square footage of one floor of your home for reference

Remember that this number is only an estimate of what your new roof will cost, and you will need to add on the cost of labor and other roofing materials.

Factors that Go into Gable Roof Pricing 

Like all roofs, the total cost of your gable roof depends on the materials, labor costs and other factors that go into construction. These factors include, but are not limited to:

  • Materials pricing for gable roofs
  • Type of gable roof
  • Basic labor costs and time to complete gable roof installation
  • Removing your current roof and dump fees
  • Size and complexity of your roof

Material Pricing for Gable Roofs

Gable roofs can be made from nearly any roofing material, so the cost of your materials will depend on the material you choose. Asphalt roofs will be less expensive at less than $4 per square foot, for example, but metal and wood roofs will be more expensive at up to $20 per square foot or more.

To build your gable roof, you’ll also need other roofing materials such as underlayment, ice and water shield and roof flashing. Much of the time, these materials are included in your roof’s quote, but not always.

Type of Gable Roof

A simple gable roof is a pitched or slanted roof that comes together at the top to make a triangle and has flat areas on the front, back or side of the home. But this is not the only way to design a gable roof. 

In fact, gable roof variations are as diverse as the roofing materials they are made with:

  • Gambrel or Dutch gable roof: Mix of hip roof and gable roof, commonly used in barn roofs
  • Open gable roof: Gable that is designed with the same materials as the side of your home
  • Front gable roof: Gable roof installed only above the front entrance of a home
  • Box gable roof: Gable roof that extends over the siding of a house
  • Cross gable roof or L-shaped gable roof: Gable roof that has sections installed at right angles, often installed when there are two wings to a home or above a house and garage
  • False-front gable roof: Gable fronts that are installed to a low-pitched roof to boost curb appeal
  • Gable roof with dormers: Homes with dormer windows will have separate gables on each dormer
  • Shed roof: Gable roofs are often used as shed or barn roofs

The gable roof variation you choose for your home will impact the cost of your project because some styles need more material or require more intense labor. If your home has attached dormers, for example, you will need to pay extra for the materials and labor for each of those structures along with the cost of your roof.

White roofs vs. black roofs

Basic Labor Cost and Time to Complete Gable Roof Installation 

Labor refers to the cost of each construction crew member, their experience and how much each roofer can get done in one day. Besides your materials, this is the other major factor that impacts roof replacement cost.

This cost does vary by region, but your gable roof’s size, complexity and accessibility can also influence your labor costs. For the most accurate cost estimates, contact your local roofing companies.

Removing Your Current Roof and Dump Fees

You can install a new roof over an existing gable roof. But if you already have more than two layers of roof installed, you will have to pay for the current roof to be removed before construction on the new one can begin.

Of course, this is not always the case. If your roofer evaluates your current roof and does not notice the following, you can avoid the extra $1,500 to $3,000 removal and dump fees:

  • Roof surface is uneven
  • Roof deck is rotting
  • Too many roof layers
  • Local building codes call for roof removal

Size and Complexity of Your Roof 

Larger and more complex roofs cost more to replace than the average American roof. If you have extra features on your roof, such as multiple tiers, ventilation, chimneys, dormer windows or skylights, then you will have to pay more for your gable roof’s installation.

Pros and Cons of Installing Gable Roofs

The decision to install any new roof has its pros and cons, and as a responsible homeowner, you should weigh them all. Once you have completed your research on various roofing options, contact the best companies for roof installation in your area to start gathering quotes.

Advantages of Gable Roofs 

  • Budget-friendly and low-cost roof design
  • Great water drainage system
  • Allows for even distribution of heavy snow
  • Gables create more attic space, potential living space and vaulted ceilings

Disadvantages of Gable Roofs

  • More likely to collapse than other roof styles
  • Susceptible to high wind
  • Requires maintenance
  • Not always built correctly

Lifetime and Durability of Gable Roofs

When well-kept and properly maintained, gable roofs can last up to 30 years or more. Gable roofs can be made from any roofing material, so the material used may also impact lifespan. 

Eco-Friendly roofing options

Because of the large overhang common in gable roof design, the gable roof is more likely to be damaged by high winds. Unlike some roofs that are more streamlined, the wind will catch under the gable roof eaves. It is also not uncommon for wind to rip gable roofs off the home completely, which makes this type of roof not suitable for places that get high wind.

The gable roof’s characteristic steep slope is ideal for colder and wetter climates. This is because the roof slopes make it easier for water to drain down and for heavier snow to lay more evenly.

Are Gable Roofs Environmentally Friendly?

A gable roof is only as environmentally friendly as the material used to build it. So if you use asphalt for your roof, then your roof won’t be as eco-friendly as it would be if you installed a metal roof. 

Gable roofs can also be energy-efficient if you install proper insulation, use light-colored roofing to reflect light and choose recyclable roof material. If you are an eco-conscious homeowner who values energy efficiency, then talk to your contractor about your goals so that they can help you make the best decision for your roof.

Financing Your New Gable Roof 

Gable roofs can be a more affordable option if you choose a cheaper material, but like most homeowners, you will need to finance at least some of your project. Besides paying completely out of pocket, there are several options available to pay for your roof, including: 

  • Home equity loan
  • Home equity line of credit
  • Cash-out refinance
  • FHA loan
  • Personal loan
  • Credit card

Before you pay for a new roof, it’s always a good idea to check with your previous installation company. If your old roof is still under warranty and the damage is covered, then you might save money on your project. 

Todd Miller1, President of Isaiah Industries and experienced roofer, says that homeowners aren’t always aware of these warranties, but emphasizes that:

“Homeowners need to understand that when they buy a roof, they get two warranties typically. One from the manufacturer covering the product integrity and the other from their local contractor covering the installation workmanship.”

If you are qualified, you could also have access to government programs that offer roofing assistance. These programs — such as the federal weatherization assistance program that funds energy-efficient home upgrades for low-income families — may not cover the entire cost of your new roof, but can provide some financial relief.

The ROI of Your Gable Roof 

Like all roofs and home improvement projects, homeowners will not see a complete return on investment (ROI) with their new gable roof. But, you can expect a return on investment (ROI) of your gable roof to be at least 60% to 70%, which means it is a good idea to replace your roof.

If you plan to sell your home, a new roof can be a good selling point. Buyers often shy away from older roofs that need immediate replacement, so a new roof may make your home one of the most competitive on the market.

Costs of Maintenance and Repairs for Gable Roofs

The steep design of gable roofs makes these roofs more prone to wind damage than most roofs. If you live in an area that gets severe weather, such as tornadoes and hurricanes, then you will likely have to replace shingles every few years or after more severe storms.

The cost to repair roof damage depends on the extent of that damage. Less significant damage, such as a few missing shingles or broken gutters, may cost $150 or less. But if larger roof sections are damaged and the functionality of your roof is in danger, then you may be looking at thousands of dollars in repairs.

This roof may have a simplistic design, but homeowners should not attempt repairs themselves. Homeowners who attempt gable roof repairs themselves may not fit pieces correctly, which can make the roof vulnerable to water and further damage. For that reason, anyone interested in buying a home with a gable roof should opt for a home inspection and check the roof before purchase.

Roof Painting Prices for Gable Roofs

You should have no problem painting your gable roof, but some materials take to paint better than others. For instance, you can absolutely paint metal roofs, and this is a cost-effective way to touch up an aging roof. Instead of paying $20,000 to $40,000 or more for a new roof, a new coat of paint costs as little as $1,000 to $3,000.

As with all projects, your gable roof paint project will be more expensive if you hire a professional company to do the job. But with how steep gable roofs are, we do not recommend that you paint it yourself. In this case, the professionals are worth the money.

Costs of Cleaning Your Gable Roof 

At least once a year, if not twice, you should clean your gable roof and gutters. Roofs that are well maintained not only last longer, but you can catch damage before it leads to more significant problems.

The cost to clean your gable roof depends on the material it’s made of, its complexity and the slope. Some materials, such as metal roofs, need more expensive power washing. Others, such as asphalt shingles, require a less expensive chemical wash. 

Because gable roofs have such sloped roofs, it’s not recommended for homeowners to clean these roofs themselves. However, if you have a good ladder and a home maintenance buddy, you can absolutely clean your own gutters.

Your roof and regional prices may differ, but you can generally expect the following price ranges to clean your gable roof:

  • Low-pressure power washing: $0.30 to $0.70 per square foot
  • High-pressure power washing: $0.15 to $0.60 per square foot
  • Chemical wash: $0.15 to $0.30 per square foot
  • Soft wash: $0.30 to $0.80 per square foot

Are Gable Roofs Worth the Cost?

Gable roofs are an affordable way to add valuable curb appeal to your home. Not only can you choose the roofing material that best suits your needs, but you can choose to install energy-efficient and eco-friendly products to reduce your carbon footprint.

These triangular-shaped roofs are absolutely worth the cost if you live in northern regions that get more mild weather. But if you live in a place that experiences severe storms, hurricanes and heavy winds, you may want to consider a different roofing option.

FAQ: Gable Roof

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Alora Rands

Based in the Minneapolis area, Alora is an avid writer of both fiction and non-fiction. Alora has a bachelor's degree in psychology and a master's degree in child, family and school psychology, but she has always had a love for biology and environmental studies. Before joining EcoWatch, Alora spent her days working with children with disabilities and nights as a freelance writer of commercial, blog and technical content. When she is not at the workplace, Alora can be found hiking with her dogs, chasing sunsets with her camera or plotting her next novel.