Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Clean Energy Development: Where Does Your State Rank?

Energy

Natural Resources Defense Council

By Ralph Cavanagh

For the fourth consecutive year, California leads the nation in clean technology development according to a survey released today that primarily credits the state’s “clean electricity deployment, energy efficiency, policy innovation and investment attraction.”

The U.S. Clean Tech Leadership Index released today by the Clean Edge research and advisory firm in partnership with a number of other entities ranks the 50 states according to some 70 indicators covering investment and performance criteria involving all aspects of economic activity, from buildings to transportation. It uses 20 indicators to rank the 50 largest metropolitan areas.

The index provides important new evidence of the extent and benefits of California’s clean energy leadership. “In addition to the state’s top-tier position in almost every measure of sector activity, dominance in high profile areas like electric/hybrid vehicle adoption, smart meter installations, solar power capacity and venture capital makes California the unrivaled leader in the continuing advancement of clean technology,” according to the report.

The analysis found that California is the strong overall leader in clean technology achievement across all the indices, and the seven leading metropolitan areas include five from California: San Francisco at No. 1 and San Jose at No. 2, followed by Los Angeles at No. 4, Sacramento at No. 6 and San Diego at No. 7. 

However, California has plenty of competition. The top 10 states include four from the West (Colorado, Oregon, New Mexico and Washington), two from the Northeast (Massachusetts and New York) and two from the Midwest (Illinois and Minnesota). Hawaii breaks into the top 10 for the first time, in part based on its leadership position in solar generation—first in the nation in the percentage of its peak power needs obtained from that source at seven percent.

All this state leadership produced some notable cumulative gains in renewable energy generation. Wind power grew by almost 30 percent and surpassed 60,000 megawatts—to put this in perspective, the entire U.S. nuclear power industry is equivalent to about 100,000 megawatts. Meanwhile, Iowa and South Dakota rival Denmark, the world leader, in the fraction of their electricity produced by wind generation (about a quarter for each). Geothermal power added three times as much generation in 2012 as in the two previous years. Nationwide, solar photovoltaic installations were up by more than 75 percent in a single year.

Although the survey has many competitors, the index is probably the most comprehensive and rigorous national ranking. This year marks the first time Clean Edge has issued a comprehensive public report with state and metro-level scores beyond its subscriber base.

These results demonstrate that a clean energy future is possible and that—with the right policies—any state in any region of the country can lead the way in building it.

Here are the top 10 rankings by state:

  1. California
  2. Massachusetts
  3. Oregon
  4. New York
  5. Colorado
  6. Washington
  7. New Mexico
  8. Illinois
  9. Minnesota
  10. Hawaii

Here are the top 10 rankings by metro area:

  1. San Francisco
  2. San Jose
  3. Portland, OR
  4. Los Angeles
  5. Washington, DC
  6. Sacramento
  7. San Diego
  8. Denver
  9. Seattle
  10. Boston

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

——–

Click here to tell Congress to Expedite Renewable Energy

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A man pushes his mother in a wheelchair down Ocean Drive in South Beach, Miami on May 19, 2020, amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. reported more than 55,000 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, in a sign that the outbreak is not letting up as the Fourth of July weekend kicks off.

Read More Show Less
To better understand how people influence the overall health of dolphins, Oklahoma State University's Unmanned Systems Research Institute is developing a drone to collect samples from the spray that comes from their blowholes. Ken Y. / CC by 2.0

By Jason Bruck

Human actions have taken a steep toll on whales and dolphins. Some studies estimate that small whale abundance, which includes dolphins, has fallen 87% since 1980 and thousands of whales die from rope entanglement annually. But humans also cause less obvious harm. Researchers have found changes in the stress levels, reproductive health and respiratory health of these animals, but this valuable data is extremely hard to collect.

Read More Show Less

Sunscreen pollution is accelerating the demise of coral reefs globally by causing permanent DNA damage to coral. gonzalo martinez / iStock / Getty Images Plus

On July 29, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis signed into law a controversial bill prohibiting local governments from banning certain types of sunscreens.

Read More Show Less
Oat milk is popping up at coffee shops and grocery stores alike, quickly becoming one of the trendiest plant-based milks. jacqueline / CC by 2.0

By Kelli McGrane

Oat milk is popping up at coffee shops and grocery stores alike, quickly becoming one of the trendiest plant-based milks.

Read More Show Less

"Emissions from pyrotechnic displays are composed of numerous organic compounds as well as metals," a new study reports. Nodar Chernishev / EyeEm / Getty Images

Fireworks have taken a lot of heat recently. In South Dakota, fire experts have said President Trump's plan to hold a fireworks show is dangerous and public health experts have criticized the lack of plans to enforce mask wearing or social distancing. Now, a new study shows that shooting off fireworks at home may expose you and your family to dangerous levels of lead, copper and other toxins.

Read More Show Less
Billions worth of valuable metals such as gold, silver and copper were dumped or burned last year as electronic waste produced globally jumped to a record 53.6 million tons. Curtis Palmer / CC by 2.0

By Ashutosh Pandey

Billions worth of valuable metals such as gold, silver and copper were dumped or burned last year as electronic waste produced globally jumped to a record 53.6 million tons (Mt), or 7.3 kilogram per person, a UN report showed on Thursday.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A women walks with COVID-19 care kits distributed by Boston's Office of Neighborhood Services in Boston, Massachusetts on May 28, 2020. The pandemic has led to a rise in single-use plastic items, but reusable bags and cloth masks can be two ways to reduce waste. JOSEPH PREZIOSO / AFP via Getty Images

This month is Plastic Free July, the 31 days every year when millions of people pledge to give up single-use plastics.

Read More Show Less