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10 Ways to Use Less Plastic Every Day

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By Kaye Spector

Plastic waste has become a pandemic—on land as well as in the world's oceans. What can just one person do about such a global problem? Take these simple steps, courtesy of World Ocean Observatory:

1. Avoid buying items packaged in plastic. Look for produce and other items that aren't over-packaged. Buy food in glass jars rather than plastic ones, and detergents in boxes rather than bottles. Not only are you reducing the plastic you use, you're sending a powerful message to the makers of those products that you don't like plastic packaging.

Using cloth shopping bags is one simple way to lessen your use of plastics. Photo credit:
Shutterstock

2. Use cloth shopping bags. Plastic bags are an eyesore and are dangerous to wildlife. Keep reusable bags somewhere handy—in your car or your bike or by the front door—so you don't forget them when you go to the market, grocery store or mall.

3. Skip bottled water. Carry a reusable canteen. Plastic bottles are one of the top five most common types of litter found on beaches. Since bottled water is much more expensive than tap water, you'll also save money doing this, and avoid the possible hazards of plastic toxins leaching into your beverage.

4. Upcycle. Think of new uses for old items rather than discarding them or buying new ones.

5. Bring a reusable mug when you order coffee. Stow it on your desk, in your purse, car or bag so you have it on hand when you order or refill your drink.

6. Say "No straw, please." Straws are one of the top 10 items found on beaches. In most cases, drinking out of a straw is simply unnecessary. If you do need a straw, you can get a reusable stainless steel or glass one.

7. Wear clothing made from natural (not synthetic) materials. Wearing and washing clothes causes fibers to flake off, and polyester clothing is made of plastic. Tiny particles of microplastic found in oceans around the world have been traced to such synthetic fabrics.

8. Avoid disposable tableware, or use the compostable kind. Try using washable and reusable cups, plates or utensils. When using compostable tableware, be aware they will not biodegrade in a landfill and must be disposed of in appropriate composting conditions.

9. Don't just discard electronics. Aim to repair or upgrade your devices instead of buying new ones. Sell gadgets and computer parts, or find a facility where you can turn them in for recycling.

10. Bring your own container for takeout and leftovers. When ordering takeout or bringing home leftovers, ask if you can get the food in your own reusable container.

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