Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Youth Climate Action Celebrated in Heart of New York City

Climate
Youth Climate Action Celebrated in Heart of New York City

The World Bank initiative Connect4Climate has partnered with MTV Voices to celebrate youth climate action documentaries, exhibiting a 30 second compilation of Action4Climate competition submissions on two massive Broadway displays on Times Square. The short video is part of Action4Climate, a global documentary competition that inspired more than 230 young filmmakers in 70 countries and gave them a platform to discuss their concerns about the future.

The Action4Climate jury, headed by film director Bernardo Bertolucci, features award-winning film directors, producers and international organization representatives, including Atom Egoyan, Marc Forster, Mika Kaurismaki, Rachel Kyte, Rose Kuo, Cynthia López, Fernando Meirelles, Mira Nair, Bob Rafelson, Walter Salles, Pablo Trapero and Wim Wenders.

Through their documentaries, the filmmakers help viewers see how communities are experiencing climate change, from drought in Sub-Saharan Africa, flooding in Southeast Asia, extreme weather in the Philippines and elsewhere. They show solutions, from renewable energy to inspiring leadership, and they show how societies are tackling climate change together. These are stories of hope and action, directed at a global audience.

“Climate change is a global challenge, and we need a global solution involving all sectors. Each and every one of us is involved,” said Lucia Grenna, who leads Connect4Climate, an initiative with about 200 partners that was created by the World Bank, Italian Ministry of Environment and Global Environment Facility. In Times Square, those messages had the chance to reach more than 300,000 people a day.

The World Bank Group launched Connect4Climate to raise global consciousness and encourage action on climate change, in line with the World Bank Group’s goals to end extreme poverty within a generation and boost shared prosperity.

We know from the work of scientists worldwide that climate change is a growing risk to populations, particularly to the poorest and most vulnerable who have the fewest resources to help them adapt. Without bold action from governments, businesses and society, climate change puts economic development at risk and threatens to roll back decades of development gains.

The Action4Climate competition is supported by EdisonEuropean Bank for Reconstruction and DevelopmentItalian Ministry for Land, Sea and the EnvironmentUnited National Development ProgramUnited Nations Environment ProgramTelevisionet.tv and Vimeo.

You Might Also Like

10 Biggest Threats to Human Existence

Former U.S. Sec. of Energy Ernest Moniz listens during the National Clean Energy Summit 9.0 on October 13, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Isaac Brekken / Getty Images for National Clean Energy Summit

By Jake Johnson

Amid reports that oil industry-friendly former Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz remains under consideration to return to his old post in the incoming Biden administration, a diverse coalition of environmental groups is mobilizing for an "all-out push" to keep Moniz away from the White House and demand a cabinet willing to boldly confront the corporations responsible for the climate emergency.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Climate change can evoke intense feelings, but a conversational approach can help. Reed Kaestner / Getty Images

Anger, anxiety, overwhelm … climate change can evoke intense feelings.

"It's easy to feel dwarfed in the context of such a global systemic issue," says psychologist Renée Lertzman.

She says that when people experience these feelings, they often shut down and push information away. So to encourage climate action, she advises not bombarding people with frightening facts.

"When we lead with information, we are actually unwittingly walking right into a situation that is set up to undermine our efforts," she says.

She says if you want to engage people on the topic, take a compassionate approach. Ask people what they know and want to learn. Then have a conversation.

This conversational approach may seem at odds with the urgency of the issue, but Lertzman says it can get results faster.

"When we take a compassion-based approach, we are actively disarming defenses so that people are actually more willing and able to respond and engage quicker," she says. "And we don't have time right now to mess around, and so I do actually come to this topic with a sense of urgency… We do not have time to not take this approach."

Reporting credit: ChavoBart Digital Media
Reposted with permission from Yale Climate Connections.

Trending

A rare North Atlantic right whale is seen off Cape Cod Bay on April 14, 2019 near Provincetown, Massachusetts. Don Emmert / AFP / Getty Images

An extremely rare North Atlantic right whale calf was found dead off the North Carolina coast on Friday.

Read More Show Less
Sprinklers irrigate a field of onions near a Castilian village in Spain. According to a new study, the average farm size in the EU has almost doubled since the 1960s. miguelangelortega / Moment / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

A new report released Tuesday details the "shocking" state of global land equality, saying the problem is worse than thought, rising, and "cannot be ignored."

Read More Show Less
Members of the San Carlos Apache Nation protest to protect parts of Oak Flat from a copper mining company on July 22, 2015 in Washington, DC. Brendan Smialowski / AFP / Getty Images

In yet another attack on the environment before leaving office, the Trump administration is seeking to transfer ownership of San Carlos Apache holy ground in Oak Flat, Arizona, to a copper mining company.

Read More Show Less