Quantcast

Youth Activists Urge Presidential Candidates to Address Climate Change

Climate

Energy Action Coalition

More than 50 youth vote activists with the Energy Action Coalition rallied outside of the Obama for America campaign headquarters in Chicago yesterday, calling on President Obama and Mitt Romney to take action to address climate change and support clean energy. The rally coincided with the release of Mitt Romney’s energy plan, which made no mention of climate change, and launched the Power Vote campaign, which will mobilize hundreds of thousands of young voters to turn out in the elections and call for clean energy and climate action. 

 

“We’re breaking the silence on climate change, and building grassroots support for action so that President Obama, Mitt Romney and other candidates have to answer to young voters on climate change,” said Maura Cowley, executive director of Energy Action Coalition. “Romney’s energy plan, which is nothing more than ridiculous handouts to Big Oil and Big Coal, and makes absolutely no mention of climate change, adds fuel to the fire for young voters to get out there and demand leadership from the candidates.”

Power Vote will support thousands of youth organizers to mobilize hundreds of thousands of young voters for clean energy and climate action, and call on candidates to stop stalling and start leading on climate change. President Obama and Mitt Romney have been silent on climate change. The Power Vote campaign is building grassroots support for climate action and demanding President Obama, Mitt Romney and other candidates break the silence and start taking action.

"In Ohio young people want to see President Obama and Mitt Romney stand up to the Oil & Gas industries and stop supporting handouts for dangerous fracking," said Kate Dye, a student and Power Vote leader at Columbus State Community College. "President Obama and Mitt Romney need to start addressing climate change with action for a clean energy economy, and stop dirty fracking from impacting the health of young people in Ohio."

The 50 youth vote leaders with Energy Action Coalition were gathered in Chicago this week for an intensive grassroots organizing training. The training and rally marked the beginning of the larger Power Vote campaign, which will kick-off on campuses as the fall semester starts, and will include a series of election related events, national days of action and the release of an online organizing tool that allows grassroots supporters to build their own campaigns.

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

--------

Energy Action Coalition is a coalition of 50 youth-led environmental and social justice groups working together to build the youth clean energy and climate movement. Working with hundreds of campus and youth groups, dozens of youth networks, and hundreds of thousands of young people, Energy Action Coalition and its partners have united a burgeoning movement behind winning local victories and coordinating on state, regional and national levels in the U.S. and Canada.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Dan Nosowitz

It's no secret that the past few years have been disastrous for the American farming industry.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Gavin Van De Walle, MS, RD

Medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil and coconut oil are fats that have risen in popularity alongside the ketogenic, or keto, diet.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Bijal Trivedi

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report on Nov. 13 that describes a list of microorganisms that have become resistant to antibiotics and pose a serious threat to public health. Each year these so-called superbugs cause more than 2.8 million infections in the U.S. and kill more than 35,000 people.

Read More Show Less
Rool Paap / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE

Inflammation can be good or bad depending on the situation.

Read More Show Less

By Joe Vukovich

Under the guise of responding to consumer complaints that today's energy- and water-efficient dishwashers take too long, the Department of Energy has proposed creating a new class of dishwashers that wouldn't be subject to any water or energy efficiency standards at all. The move would not only undermine three decades of progress for consumers and the environment, it is based on serious distortions of fact regarding today's dishwashers.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

By Emily Moran

If you have oak trees in your neighborhood, perhaps you've noticed that some years the ground is carpeted with their acorns, and some years there are hardly any. Biologists call this pattern, in which all the oak trees for miles around make either lots of acorns or almost none, "masting."

Read More Show Less

By Catherine Davidson

Tashi Yudon peeks out from behind a net curtain at the rooftops below and lets out a sigh, her breath frosting on the windowpane in front of her.

Some 700 kilometers away in the capital city Delhi, temperatures have yet to dip below 25 degrees Celsius, but in Spiti there is already an atmosphere of impatient expectation as winter settles over the valley.

Read More Show Less

The Dog Aging Project at the University of Washington is looking to recruit 10,000 dogs to study for the next 10 years to see if they can improve the life expectancy of man's best friend and their quality of life, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less