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Yoko Ono and Sean Lennon Launch Artists Against Fracking on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon

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Yoko Ono and Sean Lennon Launch Artists Against Fracking on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon

Artists Against Fracking

John Lennon's widow Yoko Ono and their son Sean have launched Artists Against Fracking. Ono and Lennon decided to bring together artists from all over to protest hydraulic fracturing and raise awareness about its potential to contaminate drinking water and pollute the air.

After hearing about plans to drill near their home in New York, Ono and Lennon gained support of actors including Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo and Julianne Moore, musicians such as Lady Gaga, and other celebrities like spiritual guru Deepak Chopra and author Salman Rushdie.

They launched the website Artists Against Fracking on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon and performed their new environmental protest song—Don't Frack My Mother.

On the show Lennon explained, "When the [natural gas drilling] companies showed up in upstate New York, it sort of like propelled us, it was like a fire under the tush [bottom] and we suddenly felt we had to do something. We put together this coalition called Artists Against Fracking. The website is on (sic) right now... We've got 120 artists... a lot of people, artists like Mgmt and people like Beck to Leonardo DiCaprio and Joseph Gordon-Levitt... and we got Lady Gaga. So we put this site together and if you want to go to more serious links... then it's like a porthole."

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

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