Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Yoga, Meditation on the Rise Among U.S. Adults and Kids

Health + Wellness
Yoga, Meditation on the Rise Among U.S. Adults and Kids
Pexels

If you can flow from "downward dog" to "upward dog," then you're part the growing number of yogis in the U.S.

In the last 5 years, the number of American adults and children who practice yoga and meditation has significantly increased, according to a government survey conducted last year.


The questionnaire—administered every 5 years as part of the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)—is based on the responses of thousands of Americans about their health- and illness-related experiences.

"The survey data suggest that more people are turning to mind and body approaches than ever before," NCCIH acting director David Shurtleff said in a press release.

The results show that roughly 14 percent of adults practiced yoga and meditation in 2017. That's up from about 9.5 percent and 4 percent respectively compared to a similar survey fielded five years ago.

More Americans are doing yoga and mediation, according to a nationally representative survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

The percentage of children between ages 4 to 17 who practiced yoga in the past 12 months also jumped from 3.1 percent in 2012 to 8.4 percent in 2017. More youngsters are also meditating, from 0.6 percent in 2012 to 5.4 percent in 2017.

It's not clear what drove the increases, but two of the report authors, Tainya Clark and Lindsey Black, told CNBC it may be related to the popularity of meditation and yoga cellphone apps such as Headspace and Calm. Companies and schools are also offering such programs for employees and students, they added.

"Something really special is happening with our culture at a time when we need it most," Megan Jones Bell, Headspace's chief science officer commented to CNBC. "At a time when mental health problems are on the rise, something that improves focus and compassion is certainly something the world needs more of."

Here are some of the report's highlights among adults:

  • Yoga was the most commonly used complementary health approach among U.S. adults in 2012 (9.5 percent) and 2017 (14.3 percent). The use of meditation increased more than threefold from 4.1 percent in 2012 to 14.2 percent in 2017.
  • The use of chiropractors increased from 9.1 percent in 2012 to 10.3 percent in 2017.
  • In 2017, women were more likely to use yoga, meditation and chiropractors in the past 12 months than men.
  • Non-Hispanic white adults were more likely to use yoga, meditation and chiropractors than Hispanic and non-Hispanic black adults.

And here are some for children:

  • The percentage of children aged 4-17 years who used yoga in the past 12 months increased significantly from 3.1 percent in 2012 to 8.4 percent in 2017.
  • Meditation increased significantly from 0.6 percent in 2012 to 5.4 percent in 2017.
  • There was no statistically significant difference in the use of a chiropractor between 2012 and 2017 (3.5 percent and 3.4 percent, respectively).
  • In 2017, girls were more likely to have used yoga during the past 12 months than boys.
  • In 2017, older children (aged 12-17 years) were more likely to have used meditation and a chiropractor in the past 12 months than younger children (aged 4-11 years).
  • Non-Hispanic white children were more likely to have used yoga and a chiropractor in the past 12 months than non-Hispanic black children or Hispanic children.
Valley of the Gods in the heart of Bears Ears National Monument. Mint Images / Getty Images

By Sharon Buccino

This week, Secretary Haaland chose a visit to Bears Ears National Monument as her first trip as Interior Secretary. She is spending three days in Bluff, Utah, a small town just outside the monument, listening to representatives of the five tribes who first proposed its designation to President Obama in 2015. This is the same town where former Secretary Sally Jewell spent several hours at a public hearing in July 2016 before recommending the monument's designation to President Obama.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Pexels

By Anthony Richardson, Chhaya Chaudhary, David Schoeman, and Mark John Costello

The tropical water at the equator is renowned for having the richest diversity of marine life on Earth, with vibrant coral reefs and large aggregations of tunas, sea turtles, manta rays and whale sharks. The number of marine species naturally tapers off as you head towards the poles.

Read More Show Less
Trending
"Secrets of the Whales" is a new series that will start streaming on Disney+ on Earth Day. Disney+

In celebration of Earth Day, a star-studded cast is giving fans a rare glimpse into the secret lives of some of the planet's most majestic animals: whales. In "Secrets of the Whales," a four-part documentary series by renowned National Geographic Photographer and Explorer Brian Skerry and Executive Producer James Cameron, viewers plunge deep into the lives and worlds of five different whale species.

Read More Show Less
Spring is an excellent time to begin bird watching in earnest. Eugenio Marongiu / Cultura / Getty Images

The coronavirus has isolated many of us in our homes this year. We've been forced to slow down a little, maybe looking out our windows, becoming more in tune with the rhythms of our yards. Perhaps we've begun to notice more, like the birds hopping around in the bushes out back, wondering (maybe for the first time) what they are.

Read More Show Less
The brown pelican is seen on Queen Bess Island in Louisiana in March 2021. Casey Wright / LDWF biologist

Who says you can't go home again?

Read More Show Less