Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

‘Years of Living Dangerously' Clip Shows How New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie Caved in to Koch Brothers

Climate
‘Years of Living Dangerously' Clip Shows How New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie Caved in to Koch Brothers

Clearly, SHOWTIME's Years of Living Dangerously is more than a weekly dose of clips showing inclement weather and our warming planet.

One recent clip hows how private groups influence politicians to make decisions that actively deny climate change and keep the money train flowing into fossil fuel companies. Years ago, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie pledged to be his state's No. 1 clean-energy advocate, but few believe he lived up to that claim after he removed the state from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) in an illegal fashion. The mysterious Koch brothers had a lot to do with that, as the Years clip shows.

Mark Bittman of the New York Times sets things up perfectly by interviewing Steve Lonegan—former director of the New Jersey chapter of the Kochs' Americans for Prosperity Foundation (AFP) and candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives seat in the state's third Congressional district—and then asking why Christie would want to listen to such a blatant climate denier. Of course, that answer is found in the Kochs' deep pockets.

Connor Gibson of Greenpeace wrote about the clip, as well as Christie's Koch connection, masterfully summarized how AFP, ALEC, the corporate-friendly Franklin Center for Government and Public Integrity and others often join forces to influence politicians like Christie.

"Franklin Center is almost exclusively funded (80 percent to 95 percent) through the secretive Donors Trust & Donors Capital Fund network, which Koch and others use to obscure their giving to controversial causes," Gibson wrote. "These surrogate groups allowed the Koch bros to exert overlapping influence on Gov. Christie: ALEC provided the policy pressure, AFP provided the public pressure and attack advertising against RGGI, Franklin Center helped create favorable media to support Koch’s campaign, groups like Heritage Foundation amplified the noise to reach national audiences.

"This is how the State Policy Network helps out-of-state billionaires attack policies that threaten the long-term profits of businesses that refuse to proactively address 21st Century challenges like global warming." 

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

Court Rules New Jersey Gov. Christie Illegally Repealed Climate Standards

Watch Full First Episode of ‘Years of Living Dangerously,’ Showtime’s Landmark Series on Climate Change

——–

A North Atlantic right whale feeds off the shores of Duxbury Beach, Massachusetts in 2015. David L. Ryan / The Boston Globe via Getty Images

The population of extremely endangered North Atlantic right whales has fallen even further in the last year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said Monday.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Hundreds of Canadian children took part in a massive protest march against climate change in Toronto, Canada, on May 24, 2019. Creative Touch Imaging Ltd. / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Heather Houser

Compost. Fly less. Reduce your meat consumption. Say no to plastic. These imperatives are familiar ones in the repertoire of individual actions to reduce a person's environmental impact. Don't have kids, or maybe just one. This climate action appears less frequently in that repertoire, but it's gaining currency as climate catastrophes mount. One study has shown that the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from having one fewer child in the United States is 20 times higher—yes 2000% greater—than the impact of lifestyle changes like those listed above.

Read More Show Less

Trending

For the first time on record, the main nursery of Arctic sea ice in Siberia has yet to start freezing by late October. Euronews / YouTube

By Sharon Guynup

At this time of year, in Russia's far north Laptev Sea, the sun hovers near the horizon during the day, generating little warmth, as the region heads towards months of polar night. By late September or early October, the sea's shallow waters should be a vast, frozen expanse.

Read More Show Less
Fossil remains indicate these birds had a wingspan of over 20 feet. Brian Choo, CC BY-NC-SA

By Peter A. Kloess

Picture Antarctica today and what comes to mind? Large ice floes bobbing in the Southern Ocean? Maybe a remote outpost populated with scientists from around the world? Or perhaps colonies of penguins puttering amid vast open tracts of snow?

Read More Show Less
A baby orangutan displaced by palm oil plantation logging is seen at Nyaru Menteng Rehabilitation Center in Borneo, Indonesia on May 27, 2017. Jonathan Perugia / In Pictures / Getty Images

The world's largest financial institutions loaned more than $2.6 trillion in 2019 to sectors driving the climate crisis and wildlife destruction, according to a new report from advocacy organization portfolio.earth.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch