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World's Largest EV Fast-Charger Network Coming to China

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Photo credit: IvanWalsh.com/Flickr Creative Commons

A Swiss power and automation company is working with an auto manufacturer to create what will be the world's largest network of fast chargers for electric vehicles (EV).

ABB has announced a deal with Shenzhen BYD Daimler New Technology Co. Ltd. (BDNT), the Chinese creator of Denza luxury EVs, to create a network of wall-mounted chargers that offer a range of options including remote monitoring and control of charging sessions through a mobile app.

The chargers are scheduled to hit the market by the middle of this year and will initially be sold at Denza dealerships.

“We are honored to be a partner in this venture to move urban transportation forward in a more sustainable way," said Ulrich Spiesshofer, CEO of ABB Group. "By combining car sales with fast chargers, DENZA is taking a bold step to address a key obstacle for potential buyers of EVs."

China has issued direct-current Guobiao (GB) standards for fast-charging as a way to encourage technical innovation and stimulate market acceptance of EVs. That issuance, combined with drivers' desire for longer trips and shorter charging times, gave way to the ABB-BDNT partnership.

“The DENZA represents a significant step in sustainable transportation for the Chinese automotive market. It was vital that we had the right partner to support this innovative concept,” said Arno Roehringer, chief operating officer of BDNT. “ABB is the ideal technology partner for us and—equally important—it has the service expertise to install this solution."

The companies have not announced plans for other markets yet.

The Denza EV was designed for trips of more than 124 miles and is among the first long-range EVs to hit China's market. Meanwhile, ABB began working with manufacturers and utilities in China in 2010. Last year, the company began building a local EV organization to support research and development, manufacturing, logistics and service.

Visit EcoWatch’s TRANSPORTATION page for more related news on this topic.

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