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World's First Solar-Powered Jacket Keeps You Warm All Winter Long

Business

Do you love the outdoors, but hate being cold? Well, this company might have a solution for you. ThermalTech claims to have developed the "world's first solar-powered smart jackets." According to the company, the jackets capture energy from the sun and artificial light sources to "convert and store as heat—increasing the in-clothing temperature by 18°F in only two minutes."

The company's solar-capturing smart fabric technology is designed to keeps you warm without all of the bulk typically required for optimal warmth. Photo credit: ThermalTech

Developed by a team of five Ph.D.s, the company says that their jackets solve the dilemma of choosing between "bulk for optimal warmth or sleekness for fashion," thanks to its patented solar-capturing smart fabric technology. The jackets' stainless steel mesh fabric is strong, yet lightweight, allowing them to last longer and weigh less than other types of outerwear with heat-storing materials. And the specially designed fabric should also help prevent you from overheating.

As for what happens when the sun goes down or it's not particularly sunny, ThermalTech said, the jackets can reflect and capture your own body heat.

There are three different jackets for various temperatures: Street (rated for 32 to 50°F), Explorer (30 to 55°F) and Extreme (-4 to 14°F). And there are different options for men and women, as well.

The company is currently fundraising on Indiegogo. If you donate enough to their campaign, you will receive one of the jackets for 40-50 percent off the retail value of the jacket. If you donate $139, you'll receive a Street jacket. An Explorer will run you $149 and an Extreme $169.

Check out their Indiegogo video to learn more:

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