Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

World's First Plantable Coffee Cup to Replenish Forests

Business

Unless you bring your own thermos or mug, paper cups are the de facto option for on-the-go coffee. But as we all know, producing these simple items mow down forests of trees and contributes to mountains of landfill waste. In fact, Starbucks alone goes through 4 billion paper cups a year globally and most of these plastic-lined menaces are never recycled.

Reduce. Reuse. Grow. is tackling the coffee industry's behemoth paper cup problem by giving single-use beverage holders a further purpose: reforestation.

 

But a noble project from Reduce. Reuse. Grow. is tackling the coffee industry's behemoth paper cup problem by giving these single-use beverage holders a further purpose: reforestation.

A San Luis Obispo, California startup claims to have developed "The World's First Plantable Coffee Cup." The prototype 12-ouncer has seeds from local nurseries and landscapes embedded within its post-consumer, paper-based material. That means after you're done with the cup, you can unravel it, soak it in water for a few minutes, bury it and let nature take over.

To prevent the spread of invasive plants, the bottom of the cup details the seed variety and also includes instructions on how to plant it either in the northern or central coast of California. (So if you got the cup, you wouldn't want to plant it outside of specific regions). For those who don't want to get their hands dirty, the cup can be tossed into a designated Reduce. Reuse. Grow. bin where it'll eventually be taken to a reforestation location.

The cup is currently in prototype phase, and the company is crowdsource funding in order to take it into commercial production and target coffee shops to stock the cups.

Even though there are already recyclable cups on the market, as Reduce. Reuse. Grow. points out on their Kickstarter page, those cups can only be recycled a few times before it's trashed, whereas their cups are compost certified and can biodegrade within 180 days.

"Even when we think we are recycling and doing a good deed, the paper itself within these products can only be reused [two to three times] before the fibers are unusable and discarded into local landfills without consumer's knowing," the page reads.

Seed-filled everyday items aren't exactly a new concept. There are already plantable greeting cards and even memorial tree urns, as well as a similar paper seed cup that someone tried to market a few years back.

Still, it's clear that something needs to be done about the country's 146 billion paper cup a year problem. Reduce. Reuse. Grow. began as a senior project by Cal Poly San Luis Obispo landscape architecture student Alex Henige, who wrote on his bio page, "The thought of 'throwing away' items which would later be sent into local landfills always seemed like a strange concept and ultimately a huge design flaw within or current consumption day to day actions."

We'll drink to that.

Watch here as Henige shares his concerns about consumerism and the work of Reduce. Reuse. Grow.:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

3 Young Entrepreneurs Find Revolutionary Way to Cut Out Food Waste

Charge Your Smart Phone With 3D-Printed Solar Tree

What to Consider When Buying a Can of Tuna

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Activists of Greenpeace and Fridays For Future demonstrate on a canal in front of the cooling tower of the coal-fired power plant Datteln 4 of power supplier Uniper in Datteln, western Germany, on May 20. INA FASSBENDER / AFP / Getty Images

The Bundestag and Bundesrat — Germany's lower and upper houses of parliament — passed legislation on Friday that would phase out coal use in the country in less than two decades as part of a road map to reduce carbon emissions.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Tara Lohan

Would you like to take a crack at solving climate change? Or at least creating a road map of how we could do it?

Read More Show Less
Climate campaigners and Indigenous peoples across Canada have spent the past several years protesting the Trans Mountain pipeline. Mark Klotz / Flickr / cc

By Elana Sulakshana

Rainforest Action Network recently uncovered a document that lists the 11 companies that are currently insuring the controversial Trans Mountain tar sands pipeline in Canada. These global insurance giants are providing more than USD$500 million in coverage for the massive risks of the existing Trans Mountain pipeline, and they're also lined up to cover the expansion project.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Leah Campbell

After several months of stay-at-home orders due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many households are beginning to experience family burnout from spending so much time together.

Read More Show Less
Food Tank

By Danielle Nierenberg and Alonso Diaz

With record high unemployment, a reeling global economy, and concerns of food shortages, the world as we know it is changing. But even as these shifts expose inequities in the health and food systems, many experts hope that the current moment offers an opportunity to build a new and more sustainable food system.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Brian J. Love and Julie Rieland

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the U.S. recycling industry. Waste sources, quantities and destinations are all in flux, and shutdowns have devastated an industry that was already struggling.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Pixabay

By Kris Gunnars, BSc

Unhealthy foods play a primary role in many people gaining weight and developing chronic health conditions, more now than ever before.

Read More Show Less