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World Water Day: How Levi Strauss Saved 770 Million Liters in Two Years

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World Water Day: How Levi Strauss Saved 770 Million Liters in Two Years

In honor of today, 2014 World Water Day, one company has decided to show just how much water it has saved in a relatively short period of time.

Levi Strauss & Co. launched a new line of jeans in 2011 specifically to save water during its process. By reducing about 96 percent of the water used in the finishing process, it's safe to say the company reached its goal.

While making 50 million garments for its Water<Less line from 2011 to 2013, Levi Strauss saved 770 million liters of water.

The company saved that much water by removing it from its stone washes and using a single wet process instead of multiple machine-wash cycles.

Here's a look at how Levi Strauss creates jeans while saving water:

Graphic credit: Levi Strauss & Co.

Back in 1994, the company established water quality requirements for treatment after the company uses water to finish its jeans with different shades. Levi Strauss says water leaves its factories cleaner than when it entered. Now, the company says it is committed to recycling water as many times as possible to create its jeans.

“Water is a very precious resource, and by recycling it, more will be available for the environment and for communities,” Michael Kobori, vice president of sustainability at Levi Strauss & Co., said earlier this year.

Water conservation is one of many sustainability initiatives at Levi Strauss. Last fall the company announced its sustainable sourcing process for its Dockers brand.

Visit EcoWatch’s SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS page for more related news on this topic

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