Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

A-List Celebs, Politicians Join John Kerry’s World War Zero Campaign to Fight the Climate Crisis

Climate
Founding Members of World War Zero John Kerry Arnold Schwarzenegger discussed the climate initiative on Meet the Press on Dec. 1. NBC News / YouTube screenshot

Former Secretary of State John Kerry has put together a group of more than 60 celebrities, politicians and military leaders to launch his World War Zero, an initiative with a mission of "making the world respond to the climate crisis the same way we mobilized to win World War II," as CNN reported.


"We're going to try to reach millions of people, Americans and people in other parts of the world, in order to mobilize an army of people who are going to demand action now on climate change sufficient to meet the challenge," Mr. Kerry said in an interview, as The New York Times reported.

The climate initiative intends to travel around the country, holding town hall style meetings starting in January 2020. The more than 60 founding members of World War Zero will meet with people in swing states prior to the 2020 election. They will also head to military bases where the security threat the climate crisis poses is rarely discussed. World War Zero will also address the future of clean energy in economically depressed areas that would potentially see an economic boom from a transition to renewable energy infrastructure, according to The New York Times.

To reach people in battleground states, World War Zero will focus on immediate issues relevant to constituents.

Arnold Schwarzenegger, the former Republican governor of California and a founding member of World War Zero, told Meet the Press that the language around the climate crisis needs to change to bring conservatives on board.

"I think the way to convince the whole world is by not just always talking about 'climate change,' which doesn't really mean that much to people," Schwarzenegger said to Meet the Press's host Chuck Todd, as Newsweek reported. "The environmental community has to communicate better and talk about pollution, because pollution is a threat right now."

He cited polls from University of Southern California that found when the conversation focused on pollution, conservatives became much more interested in finding solutions, as Newsweek reported.

The former governor and movie star also criticized Chuck Todd for framing the climate crisis as a threat 30 years down the road after the Meet the Press host showed a graphic that the seas will rise to cover parts of Vietnam by 2050.

"When you introduced this piece, you talked about 'in 2050.' People can't think about 2050," Schwarzenegger said, as Newsweek reported. "They think about now: 'How can I survive? How can I provide jobs? How can I go and feed my family?'"

Kerry and Schwarzenegger are not the only former politicians in World War Zero. They are joined by former presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, as well as former Republican Governor of Ohio John Kasich. Entertainment stars like Leonardo DiCaprio, Sting and Ashton Kutcher are also founding members of the group, which hopes to host 10 million "climate conversations" in the coming year with Americans across the political spectrum, according to The New York Times.

The coalition will not support one policy over another, since the members come from various parts of the political and environmental divide. Some in the coalition believe we need a rapid overhaul of energy infrastructure, while others, like Kasich, support liquid natural gas, which emits a tremendous amount of the greenhouse gas methane.

"If I've got to sign up to be an anti-fracker, count me out," said Kasich, as The New York Times reported.

Katie Eder, the founder of The Future Coalition, which helped organize climate strikes, and a member of World War Zero, supports the Green New Deal, but sees the need for cooperation as more important than a single policy.

"While I may be disagreeing with some of the things that other folks involved in World War Zero believe, that doesn't mean we can't work together," she said to the The New York Times. "Collaboration is our key to survival."

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

An elephant at Roger Williams Park Zoo in Providence, Rhode Island. In Defense of Animals

By Marilyn Kroplick

The term "zoonotic disease" wasn't a hot topic of conversation before the novel coronavirus started spreading across the globe and upending lives. Now, people are discovering how devastating viruses that transfer from animals to humans can be. But the threat can go both ways — animals can also get sick from humans. There is no better time to reconsider the repercussions of keeping animals captive at zoos, for the sake of everyone's health.

Read More Show Less
Isiais now approaches the Carolinas, and is expected to strengthen into a hurricane again before reaching them Monday night. NOAA

Florida was spared the worst of Isaias, the earliest "I" storm on record of the Atlantic hurricane season and the second hurricane of the 2020 season.

Read More Show Less
A campaign targeting SUV advertising is a project between the New Weather Institute and climate charity Possible. New Weather Institute

To meet its climate targets, the UK should ban advertisements for gas-guzzling SUVs, according to a report from a British think tank that wants to make SUVs the new smoking, as the BBC reported.

Read More Show Less

A company from Ghana is making bikes out of bamboo.

By Kate Whiting

Bernice Dapaah calls bamboo "a miracle plant," because it grows so fast and absorbs carbon. But it can also work wonders for children's education and women's employment – as she's discovered.

Read More Show Less
Scientists say it will take a massive amount of collective action to reverse deforestation and save society from collapse. Big Cheese Photo / Getty Images Plus

Deforestation coupled with the rampant destruction of natural resources will soon have devastating effects on the future of society as we know it, according to two theoretical physicists who study complex systems and have concluded that greed has put us on a path to irreversible collapse within the next two to four decades, as VICE reported.

Read More Show Less
Researchers have turned to hydrophones, instruments that use underwater microphones to gather data beyond the reach of any camera or satellite. Pxfuel

By Kristen Pope

Melting and crumbling glaciers are largely responsible for rising sea levels, so learning more about how glaciers shrink is vital to those who hope to save coastal cities and preserve wildlife.

Read More Show Less

Trending

The fact is, cats play different predatory roles in different natural and humanized landscapes. PIXNIO / CCO

By William S. Lynn, Arian Wallach and Francisco J. Santiago-Ávila

A number of conservationists claim cats are a zombie apocalypse for biodiversity that need to be removed from the outdoors by "any means necessary" – coded language for shooting, trapping and poisoning. Various media outlets have portrayed cats as murderous superpredators. Australia has even declared an official "war" against cats.

Read More Show Less