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World Oceans Day Focuses on Surging Youth Activism

World Oceans Day

Today communities around the globe will celebrate World Oceans Day as an opportunity to learn more about our ocean and take action to help conserve it. This year the celebration is bigger than ever with hundreds of family-friendly events at aquariums, zoos, museums, exciting online events and strong prospects for a new youth movement to protect the ocean.

"A record number of aquariums, zoos, and museums are providing ways on World Oceans Day for their visitors to get inspired and take personal action to help our world's ocean," said Bill Mott, director of The Ocean Project. “World Oceans Day provides an opportunity for people across the country and around the world to celebrate our ocean connections, do more for ocean conservation, and learn more about our ocean."

World Oceans Day Coordinator, Alyssa Isakower, commented, “The worldwide response has been more enthusiastic than ever. June 8 provides a chance for the world to rally for a generation of ocean advocates who go beyond raising awareness and take real action for ocean protection.”

Under the theme, “Youth: the Next Wave for Change,” many events will focus on inspiring the younger generations. Public opinion research by The Ocean Project supports this emphasis, finding that youth and young adults:

  • Express more interest and concern about the health of the ocean, and the problems of pollution, overfishing and climate change
  • Look to aquariums, zoos and science centers for ways they can be part of the solution
  • Have a higher belief in their own ability to make a difference
  • Are recognized by their parents as better informed on ocean and environmental issues

 New and exciting happenings:

  • Hundreds of events planned: Already more than 250 events are listed from dozens of countries, with several hundred more expected.
  • Dr. Seuss teams up with World Oceans Day: More than 100 institutions are planning Dr. Seuss-themed events.

People taking action around our blue planet:

  • Youth in action in Arcata, Calif.: Friends of the Dunes celebrates their 8th straight World Oceans Day. One-thousand students will conduct a beach cleanup and invasive plant removal and then will create an aerial art design, with a plane capturing the image.
  • Making a difference in the Marshall Islands: Youth groups, government and non-government agencies will participate in beach and underwater dive cleanups, and more hands-on activities.

Visit EcoWatch's WATER and BIODIVERSITY pages for more related news on this topic.

 

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