Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

World Oceans Day: Saving Our Seas Starts With You

Oceans
A monk seal swimming over a coral reef bottom. NOAA Photo Library

The world's oceans are vast and boundless, and its spectacular and innumerable diversity of sea creatures and plants may seem immune from human harm. But as U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said at the United Nations conference on oceans last year, our seas and its inhabitants are "now under threat as never before."

The human footprint has pushed marine species numbers to the "brink of collapse." The constant consumption of plastics has turned our oceans into a dumping ground. And the burning of fossil fuels has fueled ocean heating, leading to dire consequences such as declining oxygen levels in the oceans, coral bleaching and sea level rise.


Today, as we celebrate World Oceans Day, EcoWatch has launched a new vertical to highlight the critical role of our oceans, to feature heroes who work tirelessly to conserve our beautiful and precious marine environments, and to inspire readers to take action to protect our seas.

"Clean water and healthy beaches are vital for our communities, coastal economies, and way of life," Pete Stauffer, the environmental director for the Surfrider Foundation told EcoWatch. "But plastic pollution, offshore oil drilling, rollbacks to federal protections, development and rising tides increasingly threaten our ocean and coasts."

"We each have a stake in taking action to ensure the places where we surf, swim, play and live are protected for this and future generations," he added.

The ocean truly is Earth's most powerful resource. It not only feeds billions of people and contributes $1.5 trillion annually in value-added to the overall economy, it provides 70 percent of the oxygen in the atmosphere.

"Do you like to breathe? Well, then you should find the ocean important too!" Emy Kane, digital strategist at Lonely Whale, noted. "Our ocean is critical to all human life—to our water supply, oxygen levels, trade networks, food systems and general wellbeing. That's why it is of the utmost importance that we care for the ocean today to protect and preserve our future."

Protecting our oceans starts with you, because our lawmakers might not be as focused on this particular issue. A recent AidData survey of 3,500 leaders in developing countries revealed that of the United Nations' 17 Sustainable Development Goals, marine conservation ranked at the bottom of their priorities.

"The oceans are so important because of their tremendous potential—something that is unfortunately being overlooked by too many world leaders," Oceana CEO Andy Sharpless told us. "A healthy ocean, responsibly managed, could feed more than a billion people a day, and do so in a way that is truly sustainable. Wild fish can be a source of vital nutrition for the future inhabitants of our planet."

Sharpless continued, "the reason that I believe in this vision so passionately is that it's a win-win proposition. The same policies that help wild fish populations thrive—ending overfishing, protecting habitat, and stopping pollution—also protect the amazing biodiversity and stunning marine life that inspire us all."

To mark World Oceans Day, Oceana released a video titled 5 Surprising Benefits of Healthy Oceans.

Fortunately, there are many things you can do to keep our oceans healthy. For instance, say no to plastic straws at restaurants and bars, or bring your own reusable bag to the supermarket.

"Eight million tons of plastic pollution enter our oceans every year, harming sea life and breaking apart over time into toxic microplastics," Emily DiFrisco, director of communications, Plastic Pollution Coalition, told us.

You can also volunteer at a beach cleanup, pressure your local lawmakers and government to take action, and spread the word to your friends and family.

DiFrisco added, "On World Oceans Day, we challenge everyone everywhere to speak up for the ocean and join the virtual March for the Ocean wherever you live and the physical march in Washington DC on June 9."

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Michael Svoboda

The enduring pandemic will make conventional forms of travel difficult if not impossible this summer. As a result, many will consider virtual alternatives for their vacations, including one of the oldest forms of virtual reality – books.

Read More Show Less
Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility on Thursday accused NOAA of ignoring its own scientists' findings about the endangerment of the North Atlantic right whale. Lauren Packard / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Julia Conley

As the North Atlantic right whale was placed on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's list of critically endangered species Thursday, environmental protection groups accusing the U.S. government of bowing to fishing and fossil fuel industry pressure to downplay the threat and failing to enact common-sense restrictions to protect the animals.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Beth Ann Mayer

Since even moderate-intensity workouts offer a slew of benefits, walking is a good choice for people looking to stay healthy.

Read More Show Less
Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday. JustTulsa / CC BY 2.0

Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday.

Read More Show Less
The Firefly Watch project is among the options for aspiring citizen scientists to join. Mike Lewinski / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 2.0

By Tiffany Means

Summer and fall are great seasons to enjoy the outdoors. But if you're already spending extra time outside because of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be out of ideas on how to make fresh-air activities feel special. Here are a few suggestions to keep both adults and children entertained and educated in the months ahead, many of which can be done from the comfort of one's home or backyard.

Read More Show Less
People sit at the bar of a restaurant in Austin, Texas, on June 26, 2020. Texas Governor Greg Abbott ordered bars to be closed by noon on June 26 and for restaurants to be reduced to 50% occupancy. Coronavirus cases in Texas spiked after being one of the first states to begin reopening. SERGIO FLORES / AFP via Getty Images

The coronavirus may linger in the air in crowded indoor spaces, spreading from one person to the next, the World Health Organization acknowledged on Thursday, as The New York Times reported. The announcement came just days after 239 scientists wrote a letter urging the WHO to consider that the novel coronavirus is lingering in indoor spaces and infecting people, as EcoWatch reported.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A never-before-documented frog species has been discovered in the Peruvian highlands and named Phrynopus remotum. Germán Chávez

By Angela Nicoletti

The eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains in central Perú are among the most remote places in the world.

Read More Show Less