Quantcast

World Leaders to Trump: You Must Come 'Back to the Table'

Popular

China, Brazil, India and South Africa issued a joint statement Tuesday calling on wealthy countries to stick to their finance commitments under the Paris agreement, and representatives from the four major developing economies highlighted concerns over the U.S.'s new climate policies at a subsequent press conference.


China's lead climate negotiator, Xie Zhenhua, told Reuters that U.S.-China climate "discussions were going on at multiple levels." Xie's assurances may echo a firmer stance from the international community: Deputy UN Chief Amina Mohammed told Newsweek Tuesday that world leaders will be working to bring Trump "back to the table" on the Paris agreement and climate change.

"I think that where people are not well-informed, we have to go back and do that," Mohammed said. "It seems as though we are taking 10 steps forward and five back, but it's an imperative. We don't have an option. The U.S. is an important leader in this and we believe that they will do the right thing once they are better informed about it."

And draft G-7 documents obtained by Politico show that during Monday's negotiations over an ultimately scuttled statement, G-7 officials "refused to agree to stronger language touting fossil fuels without assurances from the United States that it would stay in the Paris climate change agreement."

At a media briefing, South Africa's deputy minister of environmental affairs, Barbara Thompson, said changes in U.S. policy were "of major concern," but perhaps not entirely a lost cause. "The position of the U.S. is still very unclear to us," she said. "We believe there are different views within the U.S. administration."

For a deeper dive:

Finance: Bloomberg, Reuters, FT Mohammed: Newsweek G-7: Politico

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Mapping Urban Heat through Portland State University / video

Concrete and asphalt absorb the sun's energy. So when a heat wave strikes, city neighborhoods with few trees and lots of black pavement can get hotter than other areas — a lot hotter.

Read More
Pexels

By Ryan Raman, MS, RD

Vitamin C is an essential vitamin, meaning your body can't produce it. Yet, it has many roles and has been linked to impressive health benefits.

Read More
Sponsored
The Rio San Antonio, in the headwaters basin of the Rio Grande in New Mexico, will lose federal protections under a new rule. Bob Wick / BLM California

By Tara Lohan

The Santa Fe River starts high in the forests of New Mexico's Sangre de Cristo mountains and flows 46 miles to the Rio Grande. Along the way it plays important roles for wildlife, irrigation, recreation and other cultural uses, and provides 40 percent of the water supply for the city of Santa Fe's 85,000 residents.

Read More
Climate activists protest Chase Bank's continued funding of the fossil fuel industry on May 16, 2019 by setting up a tripod-blockade in midtown Manhattan, clogging traffic for over an hour. Michael Nigro / Pacific Press / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

Climate campaigners on Friday expressed hope that policymakers who are stalling on taking decisive climate action would reconsider their stance in light of new warnings from an unlikely source: two economists at J.P. Morgan Chase.

Read More
Protesters holding signs in solidarity with the Wet'suwet'en Nation outside the Canadian Consulate in NYC. The Indigenous Peoples Day NYC Committee (IPDNYC), a coalition of 13 Indigenous Peoples and indigenous-led organizations gathered outside the Canadian Consulate and Permanent Mission to the UN to support the Wet'suwet'en Nation in their opposition to a Coastal GasLink pipeline scheduled to enter their traditional territory in British Columbia, Canada. Erik McGregor / LightRocket / Getty Images

Tensions are continuing to rise in Canada over a controversial pipeline project as protesters enter their 12th day blockading railways, demonstrating on streets and highways, and paralyzing the nation's rail system

Read More