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World Leaders to Trump: You Must Come 'Back to the Table'

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World Leaders to Trump: You Must Come 'Back to the Table'

China, Brazil, India and South Africa issued a joint statement Tuesday calling on wealthy countries to stick to their finance commitments under the Paris agreement, and representatives from the four major developing economies highlighted concerns over the U.S.'s new climate policies at a subsequent press conference.


China's lead climate negotiator, Xie Zhenhua, told Reuters that U.S.-China climate "discussions were going on at multiple levels." Xie's assurances may echo a firmer stance from the international community: Deputy UN Chief Amina Mohammed told Newsweek Tuesday that world leaders will be working to bring Trump "back to the table" on the Paris agreement and climate change.

"I think that where people are not well-informed, we have to go back and do that," Mohammed said. "It seems as though we are taking 10 steps forward and five back, but it's an imperative. We don't have an option. The U.S. is an important leader in this and we believe that they will do the right thing once they are better informed about it."

And draft G-7 documents obtained by Politico show that during Monday's negotiations over an ultimately scuttled statement, G-7 officials "refused to agree to stronger language touting fossil fuels without assurances from the United States that it would stay in the Paris climate change agreement."

At a media briefing, South Africa's deputy minister of environmental affairs, Barbara Thompson, said changes in U.S. policy were "of major concern," but perhaps not entirely a lost cause. "The position of the U.S. is still very unclear to us," she said. "We believe there are different views within the U.S. administration."

For a deeper dive:

Finance: Bloomberg, Reuters, FT Mohammed: Newsweek G-7: Politico

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