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Join the Herd on World Elephant Day

Animals

Scientists estimate that more than 25,000 elephants are being killed for their ivory every year. If that pace continues, elephants could be extinct across much of Africa within our lifetimes.

The Nature Conservancy is working with partners around the world on four main strategies to solve this complex crisis:

1. Increase Security

The conservancy is helping train and equip heroic wildlife rangers to be able to patrol millions of square miles of elephant habitat.

2. Secure Habitat

Elephants can travel up to 30 miles a day in search of food and water, so they need a lot of space. The conservancy helps protect large, connected landscapes and works with partners to implement creative solutions, such as building a highway underpass.

An African elephant with Mount Kilimanjaro in the background.The Nature Conservancy in Africa

3. Reduce Demand

Most illegal ivory is sold in China, where many consumers are unaware of its origins. The conservancy is mobilizing some of the country's most influential leaders to educate consumers and clean up the online marketplace.

4. Gain Local Support

The conservancy works with partners to ensure that elephants are worth more alive to the people living alongside them, such as by providing tourism-related job opportunities.

This World Elephant Day, you can Join the Herd here and commit to ensuring a brighter future for elephants in Africa.

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