Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

3 Books to Get You Through the End of Winter

Popular
Winter view of Anzihe Protected Area in China, pictured above. Conservation International / Liang Tang

By Morgan Lynch

To get through the rest of the winter, Conservation International (CI) staff are spending their free time with their favorite books. Here are three picks they can't put down.


1. The Invention of Nature: The Adventures of Alexander Von Humboldt, the Lost Hero of Science, by Andrea Wulf

This book tells the extraordinary story of 18th and early 19th century explorer and scientist Alexander von Humboldt. In vivid language, the book describes his milestone achievement—a five-year expedition to remote parts of South America where he ventured deep into the Orinoco and Amazon watersheds, climbed more volcanoes than anyone in history, and collected 2,000 plant species new to science. von Humboldt considered indigenous peoples' as most knowledgeable about nature's workings, he abhorred slavery, and he believed that personal experiences, emotions, exploration of the unknown and being in nature are all essential to increase scientific understanding and to generate novel insights. His books were bestsellers and they brought an appreciation for nature and its benefits, as well as the threats posed by humanity to these, to a broader audience than ever before. Alexander von Humboldt established the basis for the science of ecology, and his work and writings inspired generations of students, artists and writers, some who would later become world-leading naturalists and scientists, like Darwin, Thoreau and Muir. He believed in free sharing of data and knowledge as a way to accelerate science and learning.

Today, 200 years later, we need more role models like von Humboldt, who cherish science and the beauty of nature, and whose stories can inspire us to take urgent action to conserve and restore the nature upon which people depend.

— Sebastian Troeng, executive vice president of programs at Conservation International

2. A Week in the Woods, by Andrew Clements

The main character is a bit of a smart-aleck, who think he can do everything until he ditches his fifth-grade class during their outdoor education trip. When his teacher tries to find him, both of them have to work together (and with nature) to get back to the group. As a former Girl Scout, I was intrigued by this survival story as a kid. I wanted to try out all of the techniques that the main character used at our next camping trip.

— Morgan Lynch, staff writer at Conservation International

3. The Lorax, by Dr. Seuss

One of my all-time favorites is an oldie but a goodie—The Lorax. I read it as a child, as a young adult, and now more recently with my own children. It is a simple, but profound message that we can all relate to. We all are "in charge of the last of the Truffula Seeds. And Truffula Trees are what everyone needs."

— Daniela Raik, senior vice president and managing director for the Moore Center for Science at Conservation International

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Michael Svoboda

The enduring pandemic will make conventional forms of travel difficult if not impossible this summer. As a result, many will consider virtual alternatives for their vacations, including one of the oldest forms of virtual reality – books.

Read More Show Less
Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility on Thursday accused NOAA of ignoring its own scientists' findings about the endangerment of the North Atlantic right whale. Lauren Packard / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Julia Conley

As the North Atlantic right whale was placed on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's list of critically endangered species Thursday, environmental protection groups accusing the U.S. government of bowing to fishing and fossil fuel industry pressure to downplay the threat and failing to enact common-sense restrictions to protect the animals.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Beth Ann Mayer

Since even moderate-intensity workouts offer a slew of benefits, walking is a good choice for people looking to stay healthy.

Read More Show Less
Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday. JustTulsa / CC BY 2.0

Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday.

Read More Show Less
The Firefly Watch project is among the options for aspiring citizen scientists to join. Mike Lewinski / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 2.0

By Tiffany Means

Summer and fall are great seasons to enjoy the outdoors. But if you're already spending extra time outside because of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be out of ideas on how to make fresh-air activities feel special. Here are a few suggestions to keep both adults and children entertained and educated in the months ahead, many of which can be done from the comfort of one's home or backyard.

Read More Show Less
People sit at the bar of a restaurant in Austin, Texas, on June 26, 2020. Texas Governor Greg Abbott ordered bars to be closed by noon on June 26 and for restaurants to be reduced to 50% occupancy. Coronavirus cases in Texas spiked after being one of the first states to begin reopening. SERGIO FLORES / AFP via Getty Images

The coronavirus may linger in the air in crowded indoor spaces, spreading from one person to the next, the World Health Organization acknowledged on Thursday, as The New York Times reported. The announcement came just days after 239 scientists wrote a letter urging the WHO to consider that the novel coronavirus is lingering in indoor spaces and infecting people, as EcoWatch reported.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A never-before-documented frog species has been discovered in the Peruvian highlands and named Phrynopus remotum. Germán Chávez

By Angela Nicoletti

The eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains in central Perú are among the most remote places in the world.

Read More Show Less