Quantcast

3 Books to Get You Through the End of Winter

Popular
Winter view of Anzihe Protected Area in China, pictured above. Conservation International / Liang Tang

By Morgan Lynch

To get through the rest of the winter, Conservation International (CI) staff are spending their free time with their favorite books. Here are three picks they can't put down.


1. The Invention of Nature: The Adventures of Alexander Von Humboldt, the Lost Hero of Science, by Andrea Wulf

This book tells the extraordinary story of 18th and early 19th century explorer and scientist Alexander von Humboldt. In vivid language, the book describes his milestone achievement—a five-year expedition to remote parts of South America where he ventured deep into the Orinoco and Amazon watersheds, climbed more volcanoes than anyone in history, and collected 2,000 plant species new to science. von Humboldt considered indigenous peoples' as most knowledgeable about nature's workings, he abhorred slavery, and he believed that personal experiences, emotions, exploration of the unknown and being in nature are all essential to increase scientific understanding and to generate novel insights. His books were bestsellers and they brought an appreciation for nature and its benefits, as well as the threats posed by humanity to these, to a broader audience than ever before. Alexander von Humboldt established the basis for the science of ecology, and his work and writings inspired generations of students, artists and writers, some who would later become world-leading naturalists and scientists, like Darwin, Thoreau and Muir. He believed in free sharing of data and knowledge as a way to accelerate science and learning.

Today, 200 years later, we need more role models like von Humboldt, who cherish science and the beauty of nature, and whose stories can inspire us to take urgent action to conserve and restore the nature upon which people depend.

— Sebastian Troeng, executive vice president of programs at Conservation International

2. A Week in the Woods, by Andrew Clements

The main character is a bit of a smart-aleck, who think he can do everything until he ditches his fifth-grade class during their outdoor education trip. When his teacher tries to find him, both of them have to work together (and with nature) to get back to the group. As a former Girl Scout, I was intrigued by this survival story as a kid. I wanted to try out all of the techniques that the main character used at our next camping trip.

— Morgan Lynch, staff writer at Conservation International

3. The Lorax, by Dr. Seuss

One of my all-time favorites is an oldie but a goodie—The Lorax. I read it as a child, as a young adult, and now more recently with my own children. It is a simple, but profound message that we can all relate to. We all are "in charge of the last of the Truffula Seeds. And Truffula Trees are what everyone needs."

— Daniela Raik, senior vice president and managing director for the Moore Center for Science at Conservation International

Related Articles Around the Web
    From Your Site Articles

    EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

    Bumblebees flying and pollinating a creeping thyme flower. emeliemaria / iStock / Getty Images

    It pays to pollinate in Minnesota.

    Read More Show Less
    Aerial view of icebergs on Arctic Ocean in Greenland. Explora_2005 / iStock / Getty Images

    The annual Arctic thaw has kicked off with record-setting ice melt and sea ice loss that is several weeks ahead of schedule, scientists said, as the New York Times reported.

    Read More Show Less
    Sponsored
    Sled dog teams pull researchers from the Danish Meteorological Institute through meltwater on the Greenland ice sheet in early June, 2019. Danish Meteorological Institute / Steffen M. Olsen

    By Jon Queally

    In yet the latest shocking image depicting just how fast the world's natural systems are changing due to the global climate emergency, a photograph showing a vast expanse of melted Arctic ice in Greenland — one in which a pair of sled dog teams appear to be walking on water — has gone viral.

    Read More Show Less
    CAFOs often store animal waste in massive, open-air lagoons, like this one at Vanguard Farms in Chocowinity, North Carolina. Bacteria feeding on the animal waste turns the mixture a bright pink. picstever / Flickr / CC BY-ND 2.0

    By Tia Schwab

    It has been almost a year since Hurricane Florence slammed the Carolinas, dumping a record 30 inches of rainfall in some parts of the states. At least 52 people died, and property and economic losses reached $24 billion, with nearly $17 billion in North Carolina alone. Flood waters also killed an estimated 3.5 million chickens and 5,500 hogs.

    Read More Show Less
    Members of the NY Renews coalition gathered before New York lawmakers reached a deal on the Climate and Communities Protection Act. NYRenews / Twitter

    By Julia Conley

    Grassroots climate campaigners in New York applauded on Monday after state lawmakers reached a deal on sweeping climate legislation, paving the way for the passage of what could be some of the country's most ambitious environmental reforms.

    Read More Show Less
    Sponsored
    In this picture taken on June 4, an Indian boatman walks amid boats on the dried bed of a lake at Nalsarovar Bird Sanctuary, on the eve of World Environment Day. Sam Panthaky / AFP / Getty Images

    By Julia Conley

    Nearly 50 people died on Saturday in one Indian state as record-breaking heatwaves across the country have caused an increasingly desperate situation.

    Read More Show Less
    A man carries a poster in New York City during the second annual nationwide March For Science on April 14, 2018. Kena Betancur / Getty Images

    By Will J. Grant

    In an ideal world, people would look at issues with a clear focus only on the facts. But in the real world, we know that doesn't happen often.

    People often look at issues through the prism of their own particular political identity — and have probably always done so.

    Read More Show Less

    YinYang / E+ / Getty Images

    In a blow to the Trump administration, the Supreme Court ruled Monday to uphold a Virginia ban on mining uranium, Reuters reported.

    Read More Show Less