Quantcast

Winners Announced: 'World of 7 Billion' Student Video Contest

By Population Connection

Sixteen U.S. and one Belgian student earned the top spots in the World of 7 Billion video contest sponsored by Population Connection. The competition included nearly 2,000 video submissions from middle and high school students from 28 countries and 44 U.S. states and territories. The videos explored population growth as it relates to deforestation, public health and water scarcity.

The three high school first-place winners each received a $1,000 cash prize, while the three second-place winners each received a $500 cash prize and six honorable mentions each received a $250 cash prize. Middle schools students who claimed first and second place received $500 and $250 respectively.

“This contest creates an opportunity for youth to use videos to highlight some of the environmental and social threats facing our world," John Seager, president of Population Connection, said. “Every year, participating students from around the country and the world not only share this message but give us hope with their passion and creativity."

The contest was organized and promoted during the 2015-16 school year by Population Education, a program of Population Connection. A panel of 47 judges—including college and high school educators, filmmakers and professionals working in relevant fields—selected the finalists.

“This was the first year we opened the contest up to middle school as well as high school students and the complexity with which they discussed these issues was stunning," Pam Wasserman, vice president for education at Population Connection, said. "The videos were of great quality, including informative and thought-provoking analysis and innovative solutions for some of the global challenges we face."

View the winning videos and student bios here.

2015-2016 First Place Deforestation Winners

Middle School Winner

High School Winner

2015-2016 First Place Public Health Winners

Middle School Winner

High School Winner

2015-2016 First Place Water Scarcity Winners

Middle School Winner

High School Winner

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Apple Is Generating So Much Renewable Energy It Plans to Start Selling It

The Climate Costs of Offshore Oil Drilling

Whistleblower Says EPA Officials Covered Up Toxic Fracking Methane Emissions for Years

Kids Get Their Day in Court: 21 Youth Sue U.S. Government in Landmark Climate Lawsuit

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Trump leaves after delivering a speech at the Congress Centre during the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos on Jan. 21, 2020. JIM WATSON / AFP via Getty Images

U.S. President Donald Trump dismissed the concerns of environmental activists as "pessimism" in a speech to political and business leaders at the start of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos on Tuesday.

Read More

Warning: The video above may be upsetting to viewers.

An amusement park in China came under fire on social media this weekend for forcing a pig off a 230 foot-high bungee tower.

Read More
Sponsored
Participants at the tree-planting event in Ankazobe district, Madagascar, on Jan. 19. Valisoa Rasolofomboahangy / Mongabay

By Malavika Vyawahare, Valisoa Rasolofomboahangy

Madagascar has embarked on its most ambitious tree-planting drive yet, aiming to plant 60 million trees in the coming months. The island nation celebrates 60 years of independence this year, and the start of the planting campaign on Jan. 19 marked one year since the inauguration of President Andry Rajoelina, who has promised to restore Madagascar's lost forests.

Read More
A pedestrian wearing a mask walks in a residential area in Beijing on Jan. 21, 2020. The number of people in China infected by a new SARS-like virus jumped to 291, according to authorities. WANG ZHAO / AFP via Getty Images

A new coronavirus that began sickening people in China late in 2019 can be transmitted from human to human, the country's health ministry announced Monday.

Read More
New pine trees grow from the forest floor along the North Fork of the Flathead River on the western boundary of Glacier National Park on Sept. 16, 2019 near West Glacier, Montana. Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

By Alex Kirby

New forests are an apparently promising way to tackle global heating: the trees absorb carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas from human activities. But there's a snag, because permanently lower river flows can be an unintended consequence.

Read More