Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Wineries and Breweries Call on Gov. Cuomo to Ban Fracking

Energy
Wineries and Breweries Call on Gov. Cuomo to Ban Fracking

New Yorkers Against Fracking

Wineries and breweries call on Gov. Cuomo to ban fracking. Photo credit Julia Walsh

Today at Gov. Cuomo’s wine and beer summit, breweries and wineries who were invited gathered to call on him to ban fracking. They also promised to raise the issue inside the summit, making the argument that allowing fracking to go forward would undercut their industries.
 
“If fracking comes to New York, our brewery won’t put our beer drinkers at risk,” said Larry Bennett of Brewery Ommegang. “We depend on clean water for our beer, and we will be forced to either truck in water—which is expensive—move or shut down. None are good options.”

The beer and wine industries employ 10,000 New Yorkers and depend on clean water to make their beverages. Toxic byproducts from the fracking process often pollute the watershed and damage agriculture, putting the growing industries at risk.

Jennifer Clark from Eminence Winery said, “We work with four excellent growers in the Finger Lakes. Not only are the vineyards above theMarcellus Shale, and therefore are vulnerable to the harmful effects of fracking, but gas storage and transport just north of Watkins Glen threatens to contaminate the water, destroy the country roads and ravage the beautiful landscapes needed to make sure the wine and beer industry thrives in New York.”

“Governor Cuomo has the chance to protect the beer and wine industries by banning fracking in New York,” said Art Hunt of Hunt Country Vineyards. “We hope the governor will continue standing up for us, rather than an out-of-state industry that wants to ship its gas to China, its profits to Texas and its problems to New York.”
 
High volume hydraulic fracturing, combined with horizontal drilling, involves pumping millions of gallons of water, chemicals and sand underground to extract natural gas from shale bedrock. Multiple studies show how inherently dangerous it is. Polls consistently show that many New Yorkers are wary of fracking.
 
With or without regulations in place, fracking is a menace to public health. It lays down blankets of smog, fills roadway with trucks hauling hazardous materials, sends sediment into streams and generates immense quantities of radioactive, carcinogen-laced waste for which no fail-safe disposal options exist.
 
Since fracking began in states outside of New York, there have been more than a thousand reports of water contamination. New studies link fracking-related activities to contaminated groundwater, air pollution, illness, death and reproductive problems in cows, horses and wildlife, and most recently humanhealth problems. A recent study from the Colorado School of Public Health found that those living within a half-mile of a natural gas drilling site faced greater health risks than those who live farther away.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

In an ad released by Republican Voters Against Trump, former coronavirus task force member Olivia Troye roasted the president for his response. Republican Voters Against Trump / YouTube

Yet another former Trump administration staffer has come out with an endorsement for former Vice President Joe Biden, this time in response to President Donald Trump's handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Climate Group

Every September for the past 11 years, non-profit the Climate Group has hosted Climate Week NYC, a chance for business, government, activist and community leaders to come together and discuss solutions to the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A field of sunflowers near the Mehrum coal-fired power station, wind turbines and high-voltage lines in the Peine district of Germany on Aug. 3, 2020. Julian Stratenschulte / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Elliot Douglas

The coronavirus pandemic has altered economic priorities for governments around the world. But as wildfires tear up the west coast of the United States and Europe reels after one of its hottest summers on record, tackling climate change remains at the forefront of economic policy.

Read More Show Less
Monarch butterflies in Mexico's Oyamel forest in Michoacan, Mexico after migrating from Canada. Luis Acosta / AFP / Getty Images

By D. André Green II

One of nature's epic events is underway: Monarch butterflies' fall migration. Departing from all across the United States and Canada, the butterflies travel up to 2,500 miles to cluster at the same locations in Mexico or along the Pacific Coast where their great-grandparents spent the previous winter.

Read More Show Less
The 30th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony on Sept. 17 introduced ten new Ig Nobel Prize winners, each intended to make people "laugh then think." Improbable Research / YouTube

The annual Ig Nobel prizes were awarded Thursday by the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research for scientific experiments that seem somewhat absurd, but are also thought-provoking. This was the 30th year the awards have been presented, but the first time they were not presented at Harvard University. Instead, they were delivered in a 75-minute pre-recorded ceremony.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch