Quantcast

Wineries and Breweries Call on Gov. Cuomo to Ban Fracking

Energy

New Yorkers Against Fracking

Wineries and breweries call on Gov. Cuomo to ban fracking. Photo credit Julia Walsh

Today at Gov. Cuomo’s wine and beer summit, breweries and wineries who were invited gathered to call on him to ban fracking. They also promised to raise the issue inside the summit, making the argument that allowing fracking to go forward would undercut their industries.
 
“If fracking comes to New York, our brewery won’t put our beer drinkers at risk,” said Larry Bennett of Brewery Ommegang. “We depend on clean water for our beer, and we will be forced to either truck in water—which is expensive—move or shut down. None are good options.”

The beer and wine industries employ 10,000 New Yorkers and depend on clean water to make their beverages. Toxic byproducts from the fracking process often pollute the watershed and damage agriculture, putting the growing industries at risk.

Jennifer Clark from Eminence Winery said, “We work with four excellent growers in the Finger Lakes. Not only are the vineyards above theMarcellus Shale, and therefore are vulnerable to the harmful effects of fracking, but gas storage and transport just north of Watkins Glen threatens to contaminate the water, destroy the country roads and ravage the beautiful landscapes needed to make sure the wine and beer industry thrives in New York.”

“Governor Cuomo has the chance to protect the beer and wine industries by banning fracking in New York,” said Art Hunt of Hunt Country Vineyards. “We hope the governor will continue standing up for us, rather than an out-of-state industry that wants to ship its gas to China, its profits to Texas and its problems to New York.”
 
High volume hydraulic fracturing, combined with horizontal drilling, involves pumping millions of gallons of water, chemicals and sand underground to extract natural gas from shale bedrock. Multiple studies show how inherently dangerous it is. Polls consistently show that many New Yorkers are wary of fracking.
 
With or without regulations in place, fracking is a menace to public health. It lays down blankets of smog, fills roadway with trucks hauling hazardous materials, sends sediment into streams and generates immense quantities of radioactive, carcinogen-laced waste for which no fail-safe disposal options exist.
 
Since fracking began in states outside of New York, there have been more than a thousand reports of water contamination. New studies link fracking-related activities to contaminated groundwater, air pollution, illness, death and reproductive problems in cows, horses and wildlife, and most recently humanhealth problems. A recent study from the Colorado School of Public Health found that those living within a half-mile of a natural gas drilling site faced greater health risks than those who live farther away.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Augusta National / Getty Images

By Bob Curley

  • The new chicken sandwiches at McDonald's, Popeyes, and Chick-fil-A all contain the MSG flavor enhancement chemical.
  • Experts say MSG can enhance the so-called umami flavor of a food.
  • The ingredient is found in everything from Chinese food and pizza to prepackaged sandwiches and table sauces.

McDonald's wants to get in on the chicken sandwich war currently being waged between Popeyes and Chick-fil-A.

Read More
Protesters march during a "Friday for future" youth demonstration in a street of Davos on Jan. 24 on the sideline of the World Economic Forum annual meeting. FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Youth climate activists marched through the streets of Davos, Switzerland Friday as the World Economic Forum wrapped up in a Fridays for Future demonstration underscoring their demand that the global elite act swiftly to tackle the climate emergency.

Read More
Sponsored
chuchart duangdaw / Moment / Getty Images

By Tim Radford

The year is less than four weeks old, but scientists already know that carbon dioxide emissions will continue to head upwards — as they have every year since measurements began leading to a continuation of the Earth's rising heat.

Read More
Lucy Lambriex / DigitalVision / Getty Images

By Katey Davidson

Each year, an estimated 600 million people worldwide experience a foodborne illness.

While there are many causes, a major and preventable one is cross-contamination.

Read More
picture alliance / dpa / F. Rumpenhorst

By Arthur Sullivan

When was the last time you traveled by plane? Various researchers say as little as between 5 and 10 percent of the global population fly in a given year.

Read More