Jalousie Windows Cost 2022: Installation & Replacement Guide

In this guide to jalousie window replacements, we’ll discuss:

  • The average cost to replace a jalousie window — around $250 per window — and the typical price range — $150 to $350 in most cases
  • Why jalousie windows are often coupled with additional security measures that can raise the price
  • Why jalousie windows are great for warmer climates and areas where heavy rainfall is common
Ecowatch Author Dan Simms

By Dan Simms

Updated 11/28/2022

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When you need to replace a window, it’s probably tempting to do the work yourself and save some money on labor costs. However, when it comes to jalousie windows, the price to have a professional complete the work is affordable and usually worthwhile. Replacing a jalousie window costs an average of just $250 or anywhere between $150 and $350.

In this guide to jalousie windows, we’ll discuss what this style of window is, the upsides and downsides of having jalousies in your home and what factors can influence your replacement cost. We’ll also offer some tips on buying jalousie windows and saving money in the process.

Jump To: What Are Jalousie Windows? | Benefits of Jalousie Windows | Drawbacks of Jalousie Windows | How Much Are Jalousie Windows Really? | Window Cost Factors | Installation Pricing Factors | Average Costs of Jalousie Windows by Window Style | Jalousie Window Prices by Size | How to Purchase Jalousie Windows | Best Brands and Pricing for Jalousie Windows | How to Get the Best Prices | Calculating Your Budget | FAQ

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What Are Jalousie Windows?

Jalousie windows — sometimes referred to as louver windows or slatted windows — are more like Venetian blinds — louvered window blinds — than they are traditional windows. They consist of a series of horizontally-oriented glass panes that can tilt outward together to provide ventilation and a view of the outdoors.

Jalousie windows used to be more common in warmer states — like Florida and Hawaii — before air conditioning was prevalent. Today, they’re still used to provide ventilation in temperate areas, but they’re more often used as a decorative element and to elevate outdoor spaces like enclosed patios, sunrooms and outdoor balconies.

Benefits of Jalousie Windows

Although jalousie windows have fallen out of favor a bit, they still do provide several key benefits not offered by any other style of window. We’ll discuss some of the most appealing upsides of jalousie windows below.
Jalousie windows view from outside

  • Excellent ventilation: The glass slats on these windows can tilt to let air flow freely into your home. With no permanent sashes in the way — like you’d find on single-hung and double-hung windows — you get maximum access to fresh air. This style is often considered the best window option for ventilation.
  • Protection from rain: Unlike many window types — most, in fact, with the exception of awning windows — jalousie windows can remain open for ventilation without the risk of rain getting into your home. If you angle the glass panels downward, air can still flow in, but the rain will drip down the window glass and onto the ground below. This is why this style of window is ideal for warm climates where heavy or frequent rain and hurricanes are expected and can be an alternative to hurricane windows.
  • Privacy: Jalousie windows are a French window design, and the French word “jalousie” translates to “jealousy.” Most people believe the style’s name came about because jealous passersby couldn’t see into your home, but you could see out.
  • Elegance: Jalousie windows were once the norm, but now that they have become less common, most people see them as an elegant window solution. They add a pleasing and unique aesthetic to just about any space in which they’re installed.
  • Affordability: Finally, jalousie windows are among the most affordable windows you can install. The average window replacement cost is around $600, but the average cost to replace a jalousie window is less than half that at just $250.

Drawbacks of Jalousie Windows

Jalousie windows also come with several drawbacks that make them unsuitable in some situations. We’ll discuss the downsides of this style of window below.

  • Poor energy efficiency: Unfortunately, jalousie windows are one of the least energy-efficient window options available, as the louvers don’t create an airtight seal when they close. They’re not ideal for extreme climates, although some manufacturers are now making jalousie windows with seals to improve the insulation they provide. If you’re looking for energy efficient windows there are better options. 
  • Poor security: Jalousie windows are also among the least secure types of windows. The louvers can rather easily be pried open. Some manufacturers provide additional safety measures, and some property owners install bars on the exterior to provide additional security.
  • Increased maintenance: Jalousie windows have a lot of moving parts. They rely on each of the louvers and the tilting mechanism working properly. These components can degrade over time and get damaged somewhat easily, so this style of window usually requires more maintenance than other options.
  • No longer common: Jalousie windows aren’t terribly popular anymore. Some property owners look at this as a pro because it means they add a unique appearance to the home. However, it also means that most manufacturers don’t offer these windows. You’ll also find it difficult to purchase them in a home store, and particular sizes might be all but impossible to find without ordering expensive custom windows.
  • Challenging to clean: The process of cleaning jalousie windows is a bit involved. This is because the many louvers need individual attention and because there are many nooks and crannies that can be tough to reach.

How Much Are Jalousie Windows, Really?

Replacing a jalousie window costs an average of $250, which is much lower than it would cost to replace most other styles. The majority of homeowners pay between $150 and $350, which includes the materials and the labor. The cost is low primarily because the window frame materials used in other window types aren’t required, so you mostly pay for the glass.

Jalousie Window Cost Factors

There are a few material cost factors you need to consider when replacing a jalousie window in order to get an accurate estimate. We’ll briefly discuss each of these below.

  • Style of window: Jalousie windows come in two different styles: with either four-inch or six-inch glass louvers. The difference is mostly cosmetic, although six-inch louvers will stick out into the room a bit further when they’re fully opened. Six-inch louvers tend to be a bit more expensive, although the difference is minimal.
  • Window size: As is the case with all types of windows, the size of your window opening will play a major role in your replacement cost. Larger windows require more materials and will naturally cost more.
  • Frame material: The slats on a jalousie window can be held in place with a few different materials. Your options are aluminum windows, vinyl windows, fiberglass windows, wood windows and composite windows. Since jalousie windows aren’t known for their energy efficiency, the decision on which to choose can be based mostly on your personal preference and the cost. Aluminum is the most affordable, followed by vinyl, then wood, then composite and then fiberglass. Older jalousie windows used to be made from stainless steel, but this isn’t a modern option.
  • Window construction: Jalousie windows have a lot of moving components, so the general construction of the window and the quality play a major role in your window’s durability and how much maintenance it will need. Higher-quality jalousie windows will naturally cost a bit more, but they are often worth the investment.
  • Window brand or series: Several big-name window manufacturers offer jalousie windows. The brand of the window you choose will have an effect on the overall quality of the window, the longevity and how secure and efficient it is. Choosing a higher-end brand will almost always lead to higher installation costs but may be worthwhile in the long run.
  • Glass choice and treatments: Depending on where they are installed, you might want jalousie windows fitted with different types of glass or even other materials. Some common options include clear glass for patios, frosted glass or textured glass for bathrooms and bedrooms, wood, vinyl or other opaque materials for more private areas and low-emissivity (low-E) coating on the glass to reduce the amount of UV radiation that enters your living space. Some of these options will drive up your cost per window. Unlike energy-efficient window options, jalousie windows usually aren’t available with double-glazed or triple-glazed glass.
Jalousie styled louvered windows in kitchen
Credit: Max Vakhbovych / Pexels
  • Options: Jalousie windows have exposed hardware attached to the louvers in some cases, and many have hand cranks for smooth operation. Some homeowners choose to pay more to upgrade these components for a more elegant appearance or to match their interior decor or personal preference.
  • Permit cost: Some jurisdictions require building permits even for relatively minor improvements like replacing a jalousie window. If your town or city does require permits, you can expect to add between $50 and $200 to your total project cost. Keep in mind that most property owners won’t need to worry about this charge for jalousie windows, especially if they just replace the louvers and not the entire window.

Installation Pricing Factors

The most significant price swings when replacing jalousie windows will come from material costs, but there are some things that can affect labor charges as well. We’ll explain these cost factors below.

  • Widow size and shape: Larger windows will usually cost more for the materials, but labor costs can also increase as jalousie windows become bigger or bulkier. If the window cannot be maneuvered into place by one window technician, your labor costs for multiple professionals on site will mean increased costs.
  • New vs. replacement: Installing a jalousie window where one doesn’t already exist — like in an empty window opening in new construction — will almost always be more affordable than a full replacement. Full-frame replacement for a jalousie window involves additional labor for removing the existing window, which will naturally cost more. These windows are most often found in older homes, though, and not in newer construction.
  • Lift requirement: In many cases, jalousie windows installed on the second floor — which is sometimes preferred due to the higher security risk with this style — will require a window lift to bring the frame up into position. Use of this equipment and the operator to use it safely will push your labor costs higher than average.
  • Stucco repair: Jalousie windows are most popular in warmer areas, like the southern states, where stucco siding is also more common. Stucco is energy efficient, but it can crack and chip rather easily. If the siding gets damaged during the installation, you might need to put in some additional money to repair it. This typically won’t cost more than $100 or so.
  • Seasonality: Window companies are busiest in the warmer months since most homeowners try to avoid replacement in the colder weather. Increased demand in the spring and summer, though, means increased labor costs. If you can wait to replace your jalousie window until the cooler months, you might enjoy a slightly lower project cost.
  • Geographic location: Labor costs tend to fluctuate based on the cost of living. If you live in a more expensive city or state, you’ll typically pay more to replace a jalousie window. Additionally, if you live in a busy city, the demand for replacement is usually higher, so you’ll likely be looking at a higher average labor cost.

Average Costs of Jalousie Windows by Window Style

Jalousie windows come in a few different styles, including different frame materials for aesthetic purposes, different glass types and finishes, different louver sizes and more. In the table below, we’ll include average prices for the different options based on a standard window size.

Style/Options for Jalousie Window

Typical Cost of Replacement (Per Window)

Aluminum Frame $200
Vinyl Frame $250
Wood Frame $325
Composite Frame $375
Fiberglass Frame $450
Standard/Clear Glass $250
Textured or Frosted Glass $325
4-Inch Louvers $250
6-Inch Louvers $275

Jalousie Window Prices by Size

As mentioned above, the size of your window will usually be the major determining factor when it comes to estimating the price of your jalousie window. We’ll include some common window sizes below, along with the typical cost for replacement.

12” by 24” $150
12” by 30” $175
24” by 24” $200
24” by 30” $225
24” by 36” $250
24” by 48” $275
36” by 30” $300
36” by 36” $325
36” by 48” $350

How to Purchase Jalousie Windows?

Just like with other more common window types like casement windows, sliding windows and picture windows, you have two possible options for buying jalousie windows: order them from a window manufacturer, or buy them from a big box home store.

Since jalousie windows are relatively uncommon, most of the big-name manufacturers — including Andersen, Pella and Marvin — don’t offer them. You’ll likely have to go to a specialty window manufacturer in your area to get your hands on this type of window.

Additionally, Home Depot and Lowe’s typically don’t carry these windows either, although local home improvement stores — especially in warmer areas — might. We recommend opting for a specialty manufacturer, though, as the quality will tend to be better, and you’re more likely to get a warranty on the new window.

Best Brands and Pricing for Jalousie Windows

There are only a few window manufacturers that offer jalousie windows, so you won’t have too many options. We’ll include the brief list of those that do below, along with the average price per window.

Manufacturer

Typical Cost Per Window

Coastal Windows $250
Milgard $350

How to Get the Best Prices on Jalousie Windows

You won’t have many options when it comes to brand names for your jalousie windows. Thankfully, this style is one of the most affordable to replace, so you likely won’t feel the need to shop around anyway. Still, there are a few things you can do to keep costs down:

  • Choose glass louvers: You can opt for glass louvers over vinyl, wood or another material. Glass louvers are the most affordable, even if you choose frosted or textured glass for added privacy.
  • Use stock hardware: Many jalousie windows include manual jalousie operators or crank arms, which you use to open and close the louvers. These components can often be upgraded to more durable or more appealing options, but this will raise your project cost. You can avoid these upsells to keep costs down a bit.
  • Replace just the louvers: One benefit to having jalousie windows installed is that you can release the existing louvers and replace them quite easily and as a DIY home improvement project. Replacing just the louvers is more of a window repair that will keep your material and labor costs down and will usually cost you under $150 per window.
  • Time your replacement well: You can choose to get your window replaced in the off-season, which is usually the fall and winter. Additionally, you can wait for holidays or special promotions when some manufacturers offer deals on replacement packages.
  • Replace multiple windows: Finally, you can have your window company replace multiple windows at once. This will lead to a higher up-front cost, but most installers will offer a per-window discount if they know they’ll be getting additional work from you.

Calculating Jalousie Windows Budget

Figuring out what your jalousie window replacement will cost often seems a bit up in the air because of all of the factors that go into the cost estimate. Below, we’ll include a simple formula you can use to calculate the cost of your replacement.

(Frame Cost + Glass Cost + Labor Costs + Glass Coatings + Window Accessories) x Brand Coefficient = Total Jalousie Window Replacement Project Cost

For a standard-size jalousie window with stock hardware and typical four-inch, clear glass slats purchased from Milgard, your pricing calculation will probably look something like this:

($100 + $50 + $100 + $0 + $0) = $250 x 1.4 = $350 for a single Milgard jalousie window

Keep in mind that your price for this single window could be a bit lower if you have your window company replace other windows in your home at the same time — even if the others aren’t the same style.

FAQ: Jalousie Windows

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Dan Simms

Dan Simms is an experienced writer with a passion for renewable energy. As a solar and EV advocate, much of his work has focused on the potential of solar power and deregulated energy, but he also writes on related topics, like real estate and economics. In his free time — when he's not checking his own home's solar production — he enjoys outdoor activities like hiking, mountain biking, skiing and rock climbing.