Quantcast

Wind for Prosperity to Bring Power to 200,000 People in Kenya

Business

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

A public-private partnership will bring a boost in renewable energy to some of the poorest communities in Kenya.

Thirteen Kenyan communities with about 200,000 residents are slated to receive refurbished wind turbines from Vestas, a Danish manufacturer that is working with Abu Dhabi's renewable energy company, Masdar, to provide power to areas that need it the most. The turbines will be installed alongside diesel power generators to create hybrid systems to run on small grids in remote areas that have limited infrastructure.

The projects are being coordinated with the Kenyan Ministry of Energy, Kenya Power and Light Company and several governmental agencies. They are expected to supply electricity for at least 30 percent less than the current cost of the diesel power production currently going in the communities.

“Addressing the lack of access to clean, reliable and affordable energy services for billions of people is one of the world’s most critical development challenges and is becoming increasingly prominent on the international agenda,” said Mohamed Al Ramahi, Masdar’s Chief Operating Officer.

“For the last 40 years, the United Arab Emirates has been committed to helping countries achieve economic growth and introducing technology that allows access to energy. Wind for Prosperity is aligned with Masdar’s mission to work on the introduction of sustainable energy solutions.”

The parties leading Wind for Prosperity want to install the hybrid power generation systems in 100 communities to reach at least 1 million people in the next three years. They are looking at deploying the systems to communities in Ethiopia, Tanzania, Yemen, Pakistan, Vietnam and Nicaragua.

"The introduction of renewable energy in the off-grid stations is a high priority for the Kenyan government," said Davis Chirchir, cabinet secretary of the Kenyan Ministry for Energy and Petroleum. "Hybridization will have the desired benefit of reducing the use of fuel used in the generators and this will make it possible to provide electricity to more people in rural areas.”

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Arx0nt / Moment / Getty Images

By Alina Petre, MS, RD

Vitamin D, also known as the sunshine vitamin, is a fat-soluble vitamin essential for optimal health.

Read More
Plastic waste that started as packaging clogs tropical landfills. apomares / iStock / Getty Images

By Clyde Eiríkur Hull and Eric Williams

Countries around the world throw away millions of tons of plastic trash every year. Finding ways to manage plastic waste is daunting even for wealthy nations, but for smaller and less-developed countries it can be overwhelming.

Read More
Sponsored
Pexels

By Katherine Marengo, LDN, RD

In recent years, functional foods have gained popularity within health and wellness circles.

Read More
Despite fierce opposition from local homeowners, a section of the SUNOCO Mariner II East Pipeline cuts through a residential neighborhood of Exton, PA. Erik McGregor / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Jeff Turrentine

To celebrate the 50th birthday of one of America's most important environmental laws, President Trump has decided to make a mockery out of it.

Read More
With well over a billion cars worldwide, electric vehicles are still only a small percentage. An economist from the University of Michigan Energy Institute says that is likely to change. Maskot / Getty Images

In 2018, there were about 5 million electric cars on the road globally. It sounds like a large number, but with well over a billion cars worldwide, electric vehicles are still only a small percentage.

Read More