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'The Only Full Service Crime Lab for Wildlife in the World'

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Check out this video from Great Big Story to see how scientists are solving crimes against animals.

Wildlife, including endangered species, are killed illegally, smuggled and sold for billions of dollars each year.

Founded by a crime scene investigator, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service Forensics Laboratory in Ashland, Oregon, uses state-of-the-art technology (as well as flesh-eating beetles). Meet some of the forensics experts at "the only full service crime lab for wildlife in the world."

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