Quantcast

Why You Should Eat Bugs (Spoiler Alert: You Already Are)

Food

EcoWatch has covered the growing trend of insects as the new sustainable protein source. Bugs have been hailed as the "next climate-friendly superfood," they've been offered up as the solution to feeding a hungry world and they've already been added to Oreo milkshakes (yum). Just last month, Dr. Jenny Josephs in the UK gave a TEDx talk about how eating bugs will soon become the new normal.

Now, PBS is investigating. Earlier this month, its program, The Good Stuff (inspired by NPR's This American Life) looked into the benefits of eating bugs—both for humans and for the planet. Should you be eating bugs? Is eating bugs better for the environment? Are bugs good for us?

What if I told you that you have already eaten bugs? And no I'm not talking about that time when you were five and your best friend Billy dared you to eat a cricket. "All processed food is going to contain some amount of bugs," says Steve Sullivan, senior curator of urban ecology and a bug connoisseur. Alan Lawrence, a living invertebrate specialist, says, peanut butter and even chocolate (gasp) contain some amount of bugs.

Watch the video below, to get the full story:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Why Are Climate Groups Only Focused on 50% of the Solution?

Has the USDA Approved Poultry Imports From China?

Dr. Mark Hyman: Slow Carbs, Not Low Carbs

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The exact location of the prehistoric trees saved by firefighters has been kept a secret to protect them from contamination. NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment / CC BY 4.0

It looks as if firefighters in Australia have succeeded in saving a secret grove of prehistoric trees belonging to a species that dates back to the time of the dinosaurs.

Read More
The Boxberg Power Station in Germany, which burns lignite coal, on Oct. 13, 2019. Hans-Jörg von Schroeter / Flickr

Germany reached an agreement Thursday that will allow it to stop burning coal by 2038.

Read More
Sponsored
This photograph shows green photosynthetic cyanobacteria growing and mineralizing in the sand-hydrogel framework. The living material has similar strength to cement-base mortar. College of Engineering and Applied Science at Colorado University Boulder / EurekAlert!

Cement is a remarkable building material; it's cheap, durable and readily available. However, its production is a leading source of carbon dioxide emissions, coughing up 2.8 gigatons of emissions every year, as Advanced Science News reported.

Read More
Five members of Climate Direct Action are seen before a coordinated effort to turn off valves on a pipeline in four states. Shut it Down - Climate Direct Action

Internal documents from the Department of Homeland Security reveal that non-violent demonstrators targeting the oil industry were classified as "extremists," with some organization members listed alongside known white supremacists, as The Guardian reported.

Read More
Dan Gold / Unsplash

An additional 2,100 deaths from fatal injuries may occur in the U.S. every year from a 2 C rise in temperatures, which could have grave implications for global changes associated with the climate crisis.

Read More