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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Why You Should Eat Bugs (Spoiler Alert: You Already Are)

Food

EcoWatch has covered the growing trend of insects as the new sustainable protein source. Bugs have been hailed as the "next climate-friendly superfood," they've been offered up as the solution to feeding a hungry world and they've already been added to Oreo milkshakes (yum). Just last month, Dr. Jenny Josephs in the UK gave a TEDx talk about how eating bugs will soon become the new normal.

Now, PBS is investigating. Earlier this month, its program, The Good Stuff (inspired by NPR's This American Life) looked into the benefits of eating bugs—both for humans and for the planet. Should you be eating bugs? Is eating bugs better for the environment? Are bugs good for us?

What if I told you that you have already eaten bugs? And no I'm not talking about that time when you were five and your best friend Billy dared you to eat a cricket. "All processed food is going to contain some amount of bugs," says Steve Sullivan, senior curator of urban ecology and a bug connoisseur. Alan Lawrence, a living invertebrate specialist, says, peanut butter and even chocolate (gasp) contain some amount of bugs.

Watch the video below, to get the full story:

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