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Why So Much Climate Denial in Congress? Follow the Money

Energy

Earthjustice asks, "Why so much climate change denial in Congress?" They answer, "Follow the money."

Check out this infographic and see for yourself the 163 members of Congress that deny the basic tenets of climate science. Then follow the money and see that on average, climate deniers in Congress take 3.5 times more "dirty energy money."

What's Earthjustice's solution? "Join the movement" and "demand strong climate action now."

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