Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Why Eating Bugs Will Soon Become the New Normal

Food
Why Eating Bugs Will Soon Become the New Normal

This might be one of the most intriguing TEDx Talk openers ever: "Hi I'm Jenny Josephs and I eat bugs." But it probably shouldn't be, as Josephs goes on to explain, since an estimated 2 billion people around the world already eat insects. That's nearly a quarter of the world's population.

But it's not too common in Europe, the U.S. and Canada, which is probably why to most of you reading this right now, the thought of eating bugs is completely grossing you out. Popular television shows, such as Fear Factor and more recently, Naked and Afraid, have made huge stunts out of people eating bugs. But, Josephs points out the "ick" factor is starting to fade across Europe and the U.S. as dozens of companies market their bug-filled products.

Now, you can eat chocolate "chirp" cookies (which contain—you guessed it—crickets) or an Oreo Mud Pie Cricket Protein Milkshake, which is made with "hand-dipped vanilla bean ice cream, Oreo Cookie Crumbles, Peruvian Chocolate Cricket Protein powder, chocolate and coffee flavors blended to deliver 24 grams of protein." Yum!

So, what's with the bug craze? Josephs explains that eating insects "is good for you nutritionally, it's good for the environment and it's good for our future."

Check out what all the buzz is about:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

President Obama Tweets First Blue Marble Photo in 43 Years

The Monsanto Years: Neil Young Plays Jones Beach, Rev. Billy Opens the Show

Climate Change and Baseball

A mass methane release could begin an irreversible path to full land-ice melt. NurPhoto / Contributor / Getty Images

By Peter Giger

The speed and scale of the response to COVID-19 by governments, businesses and individuals seems to provide hope that we can react to the climate change crisis in a similarly decisive manner - but history tells us that humans do not react to slow-moving and distant threats.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Doug Emhoff, U.S. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, Jill Biden and President-elect Joe Biden wave as they arrive on the East Front of the U.S. Capitol for the inauguration on Jan. 20, 2021 in Washington, DC. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By John R. Platt

The period of the 45th presidency will go down as dark days for the United States — not just for the violent insurgency and impeachment that capped off Donald Trump's four years in office, but for every regressive action that came before.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A hazy Seattle skyline due to wildfire smoke is seen on September 11, 2020 in Seattle, Washington. Lindsey Wasson / Getty Images

Washington state residents are taking climate matters into their own hands. Beginning this month, 90 members of the public join the country's first climate assembly to develop pollution solutions, Crosscut reported.

Read More Show Less
Boletus mushrooms such as these are on the menu at ONA restaurant in Arès, France. Jarry / Tripelon / Gamma-Rapho / Getty Images)

For the first time ever, a vegan restaurant in France has been awarded a coveted Michelin star.

Read More Show Less
Samples of chocolate, strawberry and taro ice cream in the Chinese city of Tianjin tested positive for coronavirus. Alex Lau / Conde Nast via Getty Images

Ice cream samples in the Chinese municipality of Tianjin have tested positive for traces of the new coronavirus.

Read More Show Less